Poem Presentation The World is too much with us - The World...

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The World Is Too Much With Us by William Wordsworth Alexandra Diaz B00120096 ENGL 3350 Instructor: Alicia Zofakis De Leon 1802
William Wordsworth April 7 th 1770 –April 23 rd 1850 Born in Lake District, England English Romantic Poet Hawkshead Grammar School, England St. John’s College in Cambridge Marked the beginning of the Romantic Age in English Literature with the publication of ‘Lyrical Ballads’ in 1798 The Prelude 1850 (Famous work) Deep sense of love and appreciation for Nature Hawkshead Museum St. John’s College
The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon, The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers, For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not. – Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. The world is too much with us
Title The world is too much with us Nature (sea, winds) Many blessings For us to see or care
Explanation Line 1: The world is too much with us; late and soon, Society can’t see the blessings of Nature past and future Line 2: Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; Materialism Line 3: Little we see in Nature that is ours; Lost connection Line 4: We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! Lost feelings nasty benefit
Explanation Line 5: This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon, Human and earth to be together Line 6: The winds that will be howling at all hours, Line 7: And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers , The breeze is sleeping Line 8: For this, for everything, we are out of tune; No importance (Sea, winds, flowers)
Explanation Line 9: It moves us not. – Great God! I'd rather be Nature not touch us Wish Line 10: A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; reborn and raised in a different religion (Ancient Greek) Line 11: So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, pleasing area (grass) Line 12:

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