LP-Civil Procedure Outline

LP-Civil Procedure Outline - Civil Procedure Outline Fall...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Civil Procedure Outline Fall, 2002- J. Sovern Laura E. Paris 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
To bring a case you need justiciability, smj, pj, notice, service, proper venue. I. Justiciability A. Issues of justiciability: 1. Mootness :  (DeFunis) an issue that is moot is not judiciable.  A  question that presents no actual controversy or which has ceased  to exist.  Forbidden by Article III.   a. exceptions:  where the court has to act in the interests of  people who are injured and do not sue  b. exceptions:  where the D is capable of repeating illegal acts  and evading justice. 2. Standing : (Power) the P must have sufficient personal stake in  the outcome to justify the court in having a claim must have  standing to bring a case.)  a. Article III and prudential considerations for standing must  be satisfied:   Standing Analysis 1) Article III :  requires the party who invokes the  court’s authority to show that he personally has  suffered some actual or threatened injury as a result  of the allegedly illegal conduct of the D AND that  the injury fairly can be traced to the challenged  action AND is likely to be redressed by a favorable  decision.   2) Prudential considerations :  1) P must assert his  own legal rights; 2) no abstract questions of wide  public significance better answered by the leg.; 3) it  must fall within a zone of interest protected or  required. 3) Statutory standing :  if the prudential  considerations are not satisfied, are they satisfied by  statute.   b. arises most often in cases with the government. c. Judicial Exception to standing:  (Griswold v. Conn.-  contraceptives case) assertion of patients right of privacy b/ c he could be made an accessory to their ‘crime.’ 2
Background image of page 2
3. Advisory opinion :  the courts cannot issue advisory opinions –  all decisions must arise from disputes. 4. Ripeness :  a case is not yet ready for adjudication (founded on  Article III and the prudential considerations.) B. Examples of what is not justiciable: 1. wagers and bets   2. games / sports (ie high school football) II. Jurisdiction  (SMJ and Personal) is the maximum power the state can  exercise. A. Competence is the power the state has chosen to give to a specific forum 1. rarely referred to in real life.   a. Used for distinction for court in states B. Subject Matter Jurisdiction  is required for a court to hear a case. 1.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 60

LP-Civil Procedure Outline - Civil Procedure Outline Fall...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online