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CHEM 1002 - CHEM 1002 Reduction-oxidation Titration Student...

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CHEM 1002 Reduction-oxidation Titration Student Name: Minh Le Student Number: 100990550 Lab Section: A5 Lab Period: Wednesday P.M. Group: D Lab Partner: Caroline Le Date (experiment was performed): 27 th January, 2016
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Purpose: By performing reduction-oxidation titration, we learn how to use a standardized KMNO 4 solution to analyze an unidentified Fe 2+ sample Theory: Redox analysis is a scientific method to determine the concentration of an unknown substance, which is either oxidizing or reducing agent, by using a standardized solution with given concentration. To perform redox analysis, four conditions are to be met. First, the reaction must generate sufficient energy in form of heat to make it spontaneous. In addition, the reaction must produce products immediately without any extra processes. Lastly, an indicator is required to observe the changes of the solution. In this experiment, an unknown sample of Fe 2+ is titrated with potassium permanganate, which acts as an oxidation reagent. The two half reactions are indicated below: Oxidation reaction: Fe 2+ Fe 3+ + 1e - Reduction reaction: MnO 4 + 8H 3 O + + 5e - Mn 2+ + 12H 2 O The overall stoichiometric reaction is obtained by add up these two equations: MnO 4 -- (aq) + 8H 3 O + (aq) + 5Fe 2+ (aq) 5Fe 3+ (aq) + Mn 2+ (aq) + 12H 2 O (l) The reaction rate is considerably slow when it reaches equilibrium point. To increase the rate of reaction, the solution is acidified by a large portion of sulfuric acid. Additionally, acidic environment is necessary to prevent side reactions from occurring, which would create brown precipitation in the form of MnO 2 . Likewise, HCl is not a valid replacement for H 2 SO 4 as the Cl -
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