Excel Exercise Directions - Graphical Presentation of Data...

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Graphical Presentation of Data in Excel Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License . The object of this lab is to learn how to create a graph in Microsoft Excel. Data from two experiments (the determination of a density and the temperature history of a liquid in a calorimeter) are to be analyzed and the data summarized in Excel spreadsheets and presented in graphs. The data and these instructions are available at christopherking.name . Plot of Mass vs. Volume for Determination of the Density of a Liquid The mass of a graduated cylinder is measured after adding various volumes of a liquid. The data are plotted. It works out that the slope of such a plot is the density of the liquid. An example of such a plot is shown on the right. To make the graph, first open the spreadsheet containing the data by going to christopherking.name , then selecting the general chemistry II lab link, and clicking on “Graphics data”. The worksheet may open on the “Enthalpy” tab. Switch to the “Density” tab by clicking on that tab at the bottom of the spreadsheet. The instructor will walk you through the following. 1. Arrange this document and the Excel document side-by-side on the desktop. Here’s how to do that: Arrange windows side by side on the desktop . 2. Plot the data. Select the data and column titles. (To select the data, first click somewhere in the spreadsheet to activate it, then put the mouse cursor over the starting cell, hold down the mouse button, drag the mouse to the ending cell, and release the mouse button.) On the “Insert” tab of the ribbon, in the “Charts” section, click “Scatter”, , then “scatter with straight lines and markers”, . This should give a plot with mass on the vertical axis and volume on the horizontal axis. 1
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3. Label axes with both a property and units. The text for the x-axis title should be “Volume/cm3”, and for the y-axis title, “Mass/g”. (This is the new style of labeling; the old style was, e.g., “Mass (g)”.) To do this, click on the chart, then click on the icon that appears, then put a check next to “axis titles”, then click in the title to change the text. 4. Superscript the 3 in cm 3 . Select the “3” (shift-right arrow may help select the last character in a textbox), then, with the cursor on the selection, right-click and select “font”. 5. Change the font size of the axes titles to 12 and the axes numbers to 11. Click on a title to select it (if you have a blinking cursor, you are in edit mode; to select the whole title, click the edge of the title box), click on the “HOME” tab (on the ribbon), and change the font size. Do the same for the axis numbers. 6. Change the title. Click in the title to change it to “Density of a Fluid”.
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