DES001__F16_Quiz01_FLASHCARDS_Small

DES001__F16_Quiz01_FLASHCARDS_Small - J-P Jeunet...

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J-P Jeunet, Amélie (2001). [Relevance: in class, we analyzed the first minutes of this film to consider how it established the story or narrative; it should also remind you of the importance of play as a developmental and educational tool for children that can be adapted as an element in the design process; how else might you connect this to DES 001?] Fiona Raby, Evidence Doll , 2005. [Relevance in class: Raby, with her partner Dunne (in the firm Dunne & Raby), uses an approach they refer to as "critical design" in which the objects they create are intended to stimulate conversations about the role of design in society; the conversations may be about what we want or expect from design, but they may also turn towards ethical discussions or other analyses that bring us to pose questions about contemporary civilization that we might otherwise not consider. For instance, in conversations with students there were some who were concerned about the objectification of men with this doll; how can we turn around that justified rage, to point out that there are many forms of representation -- including, but not limited to dolls -- that objectify women. This raised questions about the ethics of gathering or collecting DNA samples from other animals (not only humans!) and the possible purposes to which the DNA might be applied; what kind of consent should be required for this to occur? There are relatively easy ways to collect DNA samples, and this is done regularly in a variety of circumstances worldwide today. What questions could, or should, we be asking as a society?]
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Eduardo Kac, Alba: GFP Bunny (2000). [Relevance: Kac, pronounced like "cats," considers himself an artist and a poet. To create Alba: GFP Bunny , he worked with a team of scientists in a laboratory to genetically engineer a rabbit so that it would glow a distinct green when illuminated by a special light. Alba, an albino rabbit, has no skin pigment; under ordinary light she is all white with pink eyes. Kac writes: "When (and only when) illuminated with blue light (maximum excitation at 488 nm), she glows with a bright green light (maximum emission at 509 nm). She was created with EGFP, an enhanced version (i.e., a synthetic mutation) of the original wild-type green fluorescent gene found in the jellyfish Aequorea Victoria. EGFP gives about two orders of magnitude greater fluorescence in mammalian cells (including human cells) than the original jellyfish gene."The first phase of the "GFP Bunny" project was completed in February 2000 with the birth of "Alba" in Jouy-en-Josas, France. ... The second phase is the ongoing debate, which started with the first public announcement of Alba's birth, in the context of the Planet Work conference, in San Francisco, on May 14, 2000. The third phase will take place when the bunny comes home to Chicago." Due to public outcry and concern over liberating genetically modified creatures, Alba lived her entire life in a lab outside Paris. At the same time that people were enraged by the ethical questions raised by Alba's creation, genetically modified foods were being planted worldwide with little public debate over their impact. Scientists (not
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