Untitled 3 - Short Question Implicit bias The attitudes or...

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Short Question Implicit bias The attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions and decisions in an unconscious manner. It encompasses both favorable and unfavorable assessments, which are involuntarily activated without an individual’s awareness or intentional control. Example: an individual’s assumption that a child of color is from a broken family or born out of wedlock as his/her knowledge is based on media outlets that portray absent fathers in people of color’s households, people of color as criminals, etc. Other examples: Locking your car door when you “pass” a and neighborhood Teacher’s unconscious expectation of white students excelling higher than the expectation of his/her black students prevailing Self Perpetuation Cycle of Negative Racial Stereotypes The sequence in which the negative stereotypes preyed upon a group fuel fear and prejudice, which lead to discriminatory or dysfunctional behavior that is often unconscious. This makes meaningful interactions with the stereotyped group even less likely, and in turn, the separation widens and the stereotype intensifies each time we observe behavior that supports it. Example: When harboring a stereotype that most young black men are dangerous and avoiding them at all cost, individuals gives themselves no opportunity to counteract the stereotype. Thus the next time that individual witnesses a young black men being reported for committing a violent act, his/her stereotype is reinforced and his/her fear and desire for separation grows. White Privilege A set of entitlement and/or immunities that people who are racialized as white benefit from on a daily basis beyond those common to all other. It is often invisible to white people while people of color are conscious to it.
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