Child Development Final - 1 First describe a preoperational...

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1) First, describe a preoperational child's likely response to the conservation-of-liquid task. Then discuss how centration, focus on static endpoints, and lack of reversibility are important limitations to children's preoperational thinking during the conservation-of-liquid task. A preoperational child's likely response to a conservation-of-liquid task would be that the taller beaker has more liquid than the shorter beaker, if both liquids have the same amount. Centration is the tendency to focus on only one aspect of a situation at a time instead of taking several aspects into consideration. In the liquid problem, children tend to focus on the height of the liquid instead of considering that the greater width of one beaker compensates for the taller height of the other. Children also look on the static endpoints of the transformation (how things look before and after) rather than considering what happened in the transformation itself. They look at the beginning state (both levels being equal), as for the ending state (one level being higher than the other). This makes them conclude that higher level must have more and fail to consider the amount of liquid that was poured to a different, and more taller glass is actually the same water that was not changed. To add on, lacking a grasp of reversibility is common at this stage. They do not imagine what happen if they reversed the transformation; not visualizing pouring the liquid back into its original container to demonstrate that the amount would still be the same. Piaget believed these dynamic mental operations would help excel children's logical thought. 2) Choose two different psychosocial stages (ages 0-20 years old). What are the challenges that you might see a child having at this stage? How might you deal with the challenges discussed (give concrete examples)?
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