To Kill A Mockingbird - Examples of Injustice in To Kill a...

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Examples of Injustice in “To Kill a Mockingbird” The famous novel, To Kill a Mockingbird , examines many examples of injustice, including racism and discrimination against others. The setting of this novel took place during the 1930’s located in the rural southern town of Maycomb, Alabama, were the Finch family was struggling with the case of a lifetime. The background of this novel had come from a similar perspective dealing with racism and discrimination against others. The author, Harper Lee, based this novel on her childhood and a trial which dealt with how justice was not served during the 1930’s. This trial was known as the Scottsboro trial. On March 25, 1931, nine black men were arrested in Scottsboro, Alabama, and were accused of raping two white women on a train. During the trial, there was a series of events that were unjust and many of the nine men were killed for being stated guilty for the raping of the two women. (Bloom 12-14) In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird , a vast amount of racism was shown in a matter of two or three years. In the 1930’ racism was accepted and considered an extremely normal part in our society. For example, when Aunt Alexandra came over to Atticus’ house, and Scout asked why she was here, her answer was, “Jem’s growing up now and you are too. We decided that it would be best for you to have some feminine influence.” Aunt Alexandra had used this against Calpurnia, the black maid, because of her race. (To 1) The Great Depression started in 1929 and went on through the early 1930’s, and the job employment rate was extremely low. Since jobs were extremely scarce, blacks found themselves being edged out by the whites, but if they were fortunate enough, they would most likely work in the fields harvesting the crops. Another quote from the novel was by Mrs. Dubose, and she says, “Not only Finch waiting on tables but one in the courthouse lawin’ for a nigger! Yes indeed, what has the world come to when a Finch goes against his raisings? I tell you! Your father is no better than the trash that he works for!”.(Lee 17)
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