Class Covered Disabilities

Class Covered Disabilities - Various Disabilities...

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Various Disabilities
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Amputations United States, 30,000-40,000 amputations are performed annually 1965, the ratio of above-knee amputations to below-knee amputations was 70:30. A quarter century later, the value of retaining the knee joint and the greater success in doing so was appreciated, so the ratio became 30:70.
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Amputation Congenital vs. Acquired Causes – congenital, trauma, tumor, disease Congenital types: Amelia – absence of all or part of the distal portion of the limb is absent Phocomelia – all or part of the proximal portion of the limb is absent. Topographic types of Limb dificiencies: Below the Knee (transtibial) Below the Elbow (transradial) Above the Knee (transfemoral) Above the Elbow (transhumeral)
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Amputations In the United States, the most common causes of lower-extremity amputation are: Disease (70%) Trauma (22%) Congenital or Birth Defects (4%) Tumors (4%)
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Disease Diseases that can cause amputation are varied, but the most common ones are: Vascular disease and Diabetes Vascular disease limits the circulation to the extremities Diabetes, which affects blood sugar, can decrease the body's ability to heal itself
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Trauma Trauma resulting in amputation is most frequently related to motor vehicle accidents and industrial accidents.
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Congenital Malformations Congenital malformation or birth defects can result in either the person having no limb or a very short limb that is treated as an Amputation, for which a prosthetic device is made.
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Tumors Tumors of the bone, called osteosarcoma, can sometimes be treated by amputation of the limb. http://www.mossrehab.com/Amputation-and-Prosthetics/causes-of-amputation.h
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Amputations Chart shows the levels at which different Amputation s
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Upper Extremity Amputations Upper-extremity amputations, which are less common, are usually caused by trauma or birth defect; disease is not as great of a contributing factor.
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Upper Extremity Amputations Common traumas that lead to amputation of the limbs include: Industrial accidents and burns. The causes of amputation vary greatly from country to country. In countries with recent history of warfare and civil unrest, the amputation due to trauma and land-mine accidents is much greater.
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Amputation Considerations Physical Therapy : is concerned with a patient’s gross motor activities such as transfers, gait training, and how to function/mobilize with or without a prosthesis. Prothesis – an artificial substitute for a missing limb. Can be functional(split hooks) or cosmetic Phantom Limb:50 – 80% of amputees Itch, ache or feel as if they are moving Aids in the use of prosthetic as it allows for person to experience proprioception Mirror Therapy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YL_ 6OMPywnQ
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Cerebral Palsy Cerebral Palsy is a group of disorders that affects a person’s ability to move and keep their balance and posture as a result of an injury to parts of the brain, or as a result of a problem with development.
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Cerebral Palsy Signs
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