SBI3U-Exam-Review-Questions-3U-2015-KEY

SBI3U-Exam-Review-Questions-3U-2015-KEY - Kipling C I Name...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Kipling C. I. Name: ______________________________________ SBI3U Final Exam Practice Questions UNIT 1: Diversity of Living Things (Chapters 1-3) 1. Define the following terms: species, taxonomy and phylogeny - Species: organisms that can interbreed and produce fertile viable offspring - Taxonomy: branch of biology that deals with identifying, classfiying and naming species - Phylogeny: the study of the evolutionary relatedness between and among species 2. Explain what a clade depicts A clade includes a single ancestor species and all its living and extinct descendents 3. a) List the seven levels of classification from the largest grouping to the smallest Kingdom > Phyla > Class >Order > Family > Genus >Species b) Make a pneumonic to remember the order of taxa. K ing P hillip C omes O ver F or G reat S oup 4. a) Explain how a scientific name for an organism is written (binomial nomenclature). G enus species a. 1 st letter of the Genus name is capitalized; species in lower case b. always italicized if typed, or underlined if handwritten b) What is the advantage to using the scientific name over the common English name? can immediately tell if two or more species share most common ancestor; eliminates confusion and facilitates efficient communication among scientists and taxonomists worldwide 5. How does the number of characteristics shared by all members of a classification level change as you progress from kingdom to species? Becoming fewer 6. a) What is a dichotomous key? A step-by-step, two-choice only guide to help identify an organism b) How does it work? First observe the characteristics of the organism who one want to classify; Set up a series of yes-no questions; for example, Use the established key to identify all species of interest
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2 – Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Viruses and Protists 7. Draw driagrams of the following types of bacteria: staphylococcus and streptobacillus staphylococcus (lump of spherical shaped bacteria str eptobaccillus ( str ing of rod shaped bacteria) 8. Name 5 differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Characteristics Prokaryotes: Archaebacteria and Eubacteria Eukaryotes: Protists, Plants, Fungi, Animals Size 1-10 m 100-1000 m Genetic materials - Circular DNA including plasmids, not bound by a membrane - Genome made up of a single chromosome - DNA in nucleus bounded by membrane - No plasmid - Genome made up of several chromosomes, thus contains many more genes than prokaryotes Cell division Binary fission Mitosis and meiosis Reproduction Asexual is common Sexual is common Number of cells Unicellular Most are multicellular 9. Describe 3 uses where bacteria are helpful. - can be used in food production to make yoghurt, cheese, soya sauce etc. - can be genetically engineered to produce biochemicals such as insulin, growth hormones for humans as well as biofuels - can be used as vector in gene therapy to cure/treat diseases 10. What is the difference between the lytic cycle and the lysogenic cycle for the reproduction of viruses?
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern