TC's Notes - Notes 1 Table of Contents Introduction . 3 a....

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Notes 1 Table of Contents
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Notes 2 I. Introduction a. What you need to know i. http://eres.ulib.albany.edu.libproxy.albany.edu/eres/coursepage.asp 1. Password: choices ii. This course fulfills the Gen-Ed Requirements 1. Writing Intensive Option b. Subject Matter i. Controversial contemporary ethical issues ii. Reasoning, not feelings c. Skills Needed/Will Acquire i. Read challenging articles in philosophy ii. Comprehend material presented in lecture iii. Think clearly iv. understand both sides of an issue v. be able to criticize views you do not hold with logical reasons, not mere opinion vi. defend your own views vii. Express yourself orally viii. Write good papers ix. clear, well-organized, grammatical, thoughtful, persuasive d. You will acquire these skills i. Think clearly ii. understand and assess complex philosophical arguments iii. understand both sides of an issue iv. criticize views you disagree with by giving logical reasons, not mere opinions v. defend your views against opposing positions vi. write clear, thoughtful, well-organized, persuasive papers 1. Elements of Style e. How to be successful in this class i. ATTEND EVERY CLASS ii. No, we can’t take attendance. iii. You cannot pass the tests unless you know what I said. iv. Your papers should reflect lectures and readings v. Come on time, stay until the end. 1. Announcements usually made at beginning or end of class. 2. I will end on time; do not start packing up while I=m still talking. 3. Common courtesy a. To me b. To your classmates vi. How To Be an Active Learner 1. Pay attention in class 2. No reading, chatting, checking e-mail, text-messaging, fooling around
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Notes 3 3. Those who engage in these activities or any others that are distracting will first be asked to stop, and if necessary, asked to leave. 4. Ask questions, respond to statements vii. How To Get the Most Out of Lectures 1. Before class starts, take a few minutes to review your notes from the last class. 2. As soon as possible after class, review your notes. 3. This is proven to increase retention, reduce time needed to study for exams. viii. Do the assigned reading 1. Before the class lecture II. What is applied philosophical ethics? a. What is Ethics i. Conceptual Ethics (metaethics) ii. Is ethics objective? Who counts (moral status)? b. Normative ethics: i. Right (wrong) acts ii. What sort of life iii. The right (wrong) characteristics (virtues and vices) iv. Ethical Theories (secular) 1. Consequentialism 2. Deontology (duty-based) v. Applied Ethics: the application of ethical analysis to specific normative issues c. Philosophical Approaches III. Is it wrong to make moral judgments? a. Making moral judgments i. Unavoidable b. Believing that you are always right, can’t be wrong, cannot learn from others i. Arrogant IV. Can there be rational moral debate? a.
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This note was uploaded on 05/11/2008 for the course APHI 115 taught by Professor Steinbock during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Albany.

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TC's Notes - Notes 1 Table of Contents Introduction . 3 a....

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