{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

SE194W Fall - 1999 MIDTERM 1

SE194W Fall - 1999 MIDTERM 1 - JD fl 57"!”W'gb IL v...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: JD}; fl, 57"?!”W'gb IL v 61,411, fi’f'laf'j/j £7. 5 ) Naturalistic Field Research Professor Novaco SE 194W Fall, 1999 Mid-Terml The exam is in two sections: Multiple Choice (18 pts.) and Essay (7 pts). PUT YOUR NAME ON EVERY PAGE. Multiple Choice (each question is worth one point! 1. Conducting research in naturalistic settings is integral to our understanding of environment, society, and behavior because matters of internal validity require field research quandaries of rationalism in lab research external validity is inherent in field research the homogenous nature of social problems none of the above $9.0m: 2, Another important reason why someone with a social ecological perspective would do field research is a. metaphysical correspondence humans adapt to environmental conditions and fluctuations c. provisions of depository analysis d. few other disciplines conduct research in field settings e. none of the above 3. The Domesday Book was the product of the first field research project for which an historical record exists. It was based on a great survey. As a field research effort, it can be faulted for the following reason(s): a. it did not require detail in the recording of data b. its sole purpose was to provide a rationale for the raising of taxes c. the questionnaires were developed by Black Sabbath scribes d. all of the above none of the above 4. The Domesday project, undertaken by King William, was conducted with great speed. Unfortunately, it failed to incorporate methods to insure reliability or validity. a. true @ false 5. Bacon used the term “Idols” to refer to 3.. symbols of devotion @ imperfections in human understanding c. noteworthy ideas and principles (1. esteemed predecessors e. Eyes without a Face 6. One of your friends tells you insistently that, “The phone always rings when 1 am in the shower!” You might now help that person understand that this observation statement is an Idol of the Tribe b. Idol of the Cave c. Idol of the Marketplace (1. Idol of the Theater e. Idol of the Toilette 7. Professor Bill Thompson has been studying the use of DNA testing in police forensic laboratories, whereby DNA evidence is used in the prosecution of criminal cases. He has found that it is not standard procedure for DNA testing to be done “blind”, whereby the person conducting the test would not know the source of the particular sample being tested. Oddly, it is quite often the case that the laboratory expert conducting the analysis knows that the sample comes from the suspect. Now, it may surprise you to learn that the DNA demarcation shown on the test is sometimes less than clear. That is, sometimes there is uncertainty about whether the image is actually that of an allele band (the genetic marker) or about whether it is in a sequenced position that matches the criterion. Thus, lab experts sometimes conclude that the sample DNA matches the criterion DNA on the basis of their judgment that a less than distinct image of a band is indeed an allele band and/or that a less than distinct band is in a position in the sequence that matches the position that the allele occurs in the criterion sample. In effect, the lab expert ’s conclusion that a match has occurred is sometimes based on a judgment about ambiguous signals. If you are the DNA lab expert, and you know that the sample comes from the suspect, whom the police want to nab, your reading of Francis Bacon would caution you to be wary of Idols of the Tribe .. Idols of the Cave c. Idols of the Marketplace d. Idols of the Theater e. Idols of the Microscope 8. 1n Jacob’s account of the cultural meaning of the scientific revolution, the aspect ofBacon’s vision that appealed strongly to English and German Protestants was its millenarian character. true b. false 9. Theory was said in lecture to have a number of fiinctions. Which of the following is hit a fianction that is served by theory? a. descriptive b. heuristic c. schematic .fiilminative e. generative 10. As indicated in lecture and expanded in the Jacob reading, Descartes’ View of the foundation of knowledge was quite different from that of Bacon. For Descartes, knowledge is grounded in a. quantified observations b. material reality c. classical teachings .the analytical capacity of the mind e. all of the above 1 1. In her analysis of the cultural meaning of the scientific revolution, Jacob makes clear that Galileo’s work in the development of the new science argues for a social utility Thus, his work not only challenged existing Aristotelian conceptions of the universe, but it also brought him into conflict with ”.2 the rulers of Florence who did not want him to teach mathematics the Roman Catholic Church c. other scientists who believed in gravity (1. all of the above e. none of the above 12. Something can be said to be objective when a. it is preconceived b. large numbers of people accept it c. it is supported by testimony d. it has been quantified it is independent of the knowing subject 13. In conducting a study, the key phenomenon that an investigator seeks to understand and explain is called the a. predictor variable b. conceptual variable criterion variable d. operational variable 14. In the writings of both Chalmers and Morick, it is asserted that scientific observation is independent of theory. a. true . false 15. Ball’s study of an abortion clinic involved a combination of research methods. Most central was his ethnographic analysis of the setting and of staff-client interactions. In that analysis he discovered a “rhetoric“ that served a. primarily the needs of the medical staff .to neutralize the context of the deviance c. to prove societal views of abortion as murder d. to aggravate the threat to identity for the patrons e. none of the above 16. The study by Chambliss of the Saints and the Roughnecks, conducted at “Hannibal High School,” was criticized in lecture for having which methodological flaw? a. the two gangs of boys were not of the same race b the boys were not observed during the period of time ’here is little in his method that justifies the validity of his observations and inferences . his observation period was insufficiently long c. all of the above ‘ 17. The research by Fraley and Shaver was found to have a potential validity problem related to the measurement of “avoidance” in that study’s analysis of attachment behavior shown by separating couples. What raised the validity issue? observed and coded “avoidance” behavior had zero correlation with “avoidance” attachment style for men, whether separating or not separating b. they failed to conduct inter-rater reliability analyses for pairs of coders c. they relied on general impressions and failed to generate a list of specific behaviors d. all of the above e. none of the above 18. The Appleyard and Lintell study of environmental quality concerned the effects of traffic exposure on the well—being on residents who lived on streets having varying degrees of traffic. The principal methodological shortcoming of that study was a. the streets were in different sectors of the city b, the residents lived in houses that were quite different in quality c. the investigators failed to validate the differences in levels of traffic d. the investigators insufficiently assessed the traffic impacts on residents none of the above ESSAY (7 points) The question requires you to think and to integrate (Fall, 2000) Investigators who conduct research in naturalistic settings often capitalize on the occurrence of unusual happenings to study important aspects of person-environment relationships and of human adaptation to disturbances in normal functioning. Among the most noteworthy fiat ffib domains of field research concerns the effects of disasters on people who have been victimized by them and how disaster victims cope with the tragedy. Recently, a US Navy ship, the SS Cole, was severely damaged by a terrorist bomb, which killed 17 sailors and critically injured many more. Terrorist bombings have become a routine form of disaster on the world stage. Our governmental leaders have sworn to apprehend the perpetrators and exact retribution for the harm done. Leaving aside the catching the perpetrators bit and the administration of punishment bit, the pertinent element here is the issue of how to ascertain the harm done. A parallel incident presents some interesting issues for analysis. On December 21, 1988, Pan Am flight 103 was blown up by a bomb over Lockerbie Scotland. All 259 persons on board, which included many Syracuse University students returning home for Christmas, were killed. Another 11 people on the ground also died 7 they were killed when a large section of the fuselage crashed into homes on Sherwood Crescent just after 7:00 pm that evening. Pieces of aircraft, cargo, bodies, and parts of bodies were scattered all over the town and the surrounding hills. Fires and explosions from the crash and burning aviation fuel lit the night sky; sirens and screams shattered the serenity of the time before Christmas. It wasn’t until 1999, 11 years after the disaster, that Lockerbie again celebrated Christmas. Assessing the amount of harm done and to whom the harm was done is less than straightforward. Those who died in the bombing were, of course, harmed maximally. For the purposes of this exam question, leave aside those who were killed. Many of them are buried in a Lockerbie cemetery, where there is a Garden of Remembrance for all the disaster victims. They will never be helped or compensated. Your research skills will be of no value to them. Also set aside the medical harm to those physically injured or maimed by the disaster. This question will concern only the psychological damage that resulted from this callously perpetrated mass murder. When the disaster occurred, it triggered a massive emergency response from civilian and military sectors. In addition to those who lost loved ones or who saw their home or that of their neighbors go up in flames, people who were part of the emergency effort were exposed to awful occurrences. Seeing mangled bodies, severed limbs, and peoples’ belongings scattered all about and having to handle such horrific things produced considerable distress. After the disaster, many claims were initiated against the insurers of Pan Am for psychological damages. Now suppose that you are working in some capacity to direct research on the question of who has suffered psychological harm from this tragedy. Your work in this regard may be a _ fiinction of your being in a number of alternative roles: {a research consultant to Lloyds of 6' London, the insurance company for Pan American airlines, (b) research consultant to the mayor of the town of Lockerbie, E] research consultant to the Mental Welfare Commission of the National Health Service for the United Kingdom, or (d) a professor in the School of Public Health at Syracuse University. {Hy} «My V’C— '0 . @an. ((241. WILL-L) ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern