Sociol169 S06 MIDTERM EXAM

Sociol169 S06 MIDTERM EXAM - 3 Multiracial Idjentities...

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Unformatted text preview: 3 Multiracial Idjentities (Sociology 169) )1 , -. - fir‘ Midterm Exam (Wintei' 2006) F .7» 7.. - Charilie V. Morgan : i . . Multiple Choice Questions (worth 2 points each) L 1. Sara arranged to graduate fi'om high school a semester? early, and began college at Ball Sate in January of 1 963 while still living at home. Although we attempted to conceal our relationship, she faced growing suspicion from her parents and friends.- ' Her parents received anonymous phone calls in the middle} of the night reporting that their daughter was dating a "nigger. " ' Three ideas of race compete to explain identities. The above passage from Life on the Color Line: The True Story of a Mite _ _ _ -, Boy Who Discovered He Was'Black by Gregory Williams 33 illustrates which of these ideas? ‘ ‘ a. Genotype b. Phenotype c. Social connection (1. None of the above 2. I didn ’t understand Dad. I knew I wasn 't colored, and neither was he. My skin was white. All of us are white, I said to mysey.’ ‘ But for the first time. I had to admit Dad didn 't exactly look white. His deeply tanned shin puzzled me as I sat there trying‘td * ‘ classijy my own father. Goose bumps covered my arms as‘I realized that whatever he was,_ I was. I took a deep breath. I " couldn ’t make any mistakes. I looked closer. His heavy lips and dark brown eyes didn ’t make him colored, I concluded-His black, wavy hair was dtfierent from Negroes ' hair, but it was diferent from most white folks ’ hair, too. He was darker than most whites, but Mom said he was Italian. That was why my baby brother had such dark skin and curly hair. Mom told us to-be proud of our Italian heritage! That 's it, I decided. He was Italian. I leaned back against the seat. satisfied. Three ideas of race compete to explain identities. The above passage fiom Life on the Color Line: The True Story of a White ' Boy Who Discovered He Was Black by Gregory Williamsrbe_st illustrates which of thesc ideas? a. Genotype b. Phenotype c. Social connection d. None of the above 3. The conditions for becoming part of her life became very clear to me. We could reenter her world if we rejected the One in which we had lived for the past ten years. She knew little about our In?! in Muncie, nor did she want to know. Gaining '7 ' ' acceptance to her world required that we deny our black heritage and pretend that the people and icircumstance of our life in Muncie did not exist. We were to forget we were “colore " boys. She expected as to move back into her life without a past,”- ‘ without roots. without feelings fin- the people who had sheltered and cared for us when our need was greatest. I latew that‘was ‘- something we could never do. i ' ' ' Three ideas of race compete to explain identities. The above passage from Life on the Color Line: The True Story of 'a White > ' . Boy Who Discovered He Was Black by Gregory Williams has; illustrates which of these ideas? a. Genotype b. Phenotype c. Social connection d. None of the above 4. Numerous factors are at Work in such events as the Rwandan genocide. the Jewish Holocaust, or “ethnic cleansing" in 7 Bosnia. Regardless of their complex origins, these events demonstrate the capacity of ethnicity and race to arouse the emotions, sometimes to the point of homicidal flay. Meanwhile, the tenacity with which some ethnic groups cling to their identities despite the economic and political costs of doing so suggest that ethnic roots on occasion go very deep indeed. The above passage in Ethnicity and Race by Cornell and Hartmann Mt illustrates which of the following concepts? 3. Circmnstantialisrn r b. Primordialism c. Constructionism . d. None of the above ('J 'l‘ l 1:. I \ a i ‘ One of the White ethnic groups in South. Afiim I. _ -‘ ' I S the A In - boundapy and the meaning (Zr-that Menu, )9! hers, whose tde . my can be categorized as Bath‘ihe.‘ 'fj are area! I " ' . - ‘ . . ~-—-—-~—~-' _ _ _ f organizes much oftheir [m3 and action. ‘3’ fi y 6 all?!” by Afi'zkaners, it is a crucial part of their mflconcept: and it - *- -7 : a. Assigned and “thick” ___ e}blank in the alias: passage in Ethnicity and Race by Cornell and Hartmann? b. Assigned and ‘.‘thin" I " I _. c. Asserted and ‘ ' d. Assorted and “thin” e. None of the above 7 % 1 Read the following passage that summarizes a key idea presented in the video Race: The Power of an Illusion and . ' t I: question: i t ' ' . - -- Most of the world 's diversioa can be found in any local population. As Richard Lewontinfirst observed. on average. 85% of all p. j. .t '1‘"? human variants can be found within any local population, be they Swedes, Hmong or Fulani. In other words, as Lewontin - ' points out. if a neutron bomb tomorrow wiped out everyone 1in the world except for Nelson Mandela ’s Xhosa people. 85% of world 's genetic variation would still be left, though the remaining population would on average be darker skinned. The above passage b_est illustrates which of the folldwing ideas: a. That there is less variation within “racial” groups than between them "--——» bu We know a lot about specific genes and traits RAM two random Koreans are likely to be more genetically similar than a Korean and an Italian d. We know little about specific genes and traits ‘ ' l 1. In the video Race: The Power of an Illusion, how manyltimes was the word “ethnic group” or “ethnicity” mentioned? 3. None wice en times scLToo many to count 12. Sets of beliefs—-—ideologies-——provide groups and individuals with needed justifications for patterns of actions. Ideologies such as racism help people rationalize patterns of discrimination, and sometimes even extremely brutal treatment, against racial ’ minorities. Which of the following is not an aspect of the ideology of racism? ' ‘5. Race causes culture ‘55. Race determines temperamental disposition of individuals kSome races are mentally superior to others d. Racial mixing raises biological quality W Some races are physically superior to others 7 13. White males and females Were th involved in the mixing. and both whites and bla "males and females alike, were punished by whipping or public WWW Strong public condemnation fhiled ‘ to prevent illicit contacts from becoming widespread, howeVer. and in some cases intermarriage occurred. Most of the white _ parents...were from the underclass. Whether they had been imprisoned for debt, crime, or prostitution, had been kidnapped and sold, or had freely contracted for their passage, they all had been transported to the colonies to work of their indenaare. ' Although many of the resulting mulattoes were free, especially those born to white mothers. they were generally despised and treated as blocks. The above passage refers to which region of the United States? a. North b. Upper South c. Lower South 'd. Black Belt e. None of the above /\96. The one-drop rule originated during met fies m W. -) 31. We can define r i Wraiamrg the idea that ethnicity is fixed, fimdamental, and rooted in the _ . ,_ unchangea‘ble circumstances of birth. - - _ - s _ i "I. .f -, "‘2: - U _ film I 32- we can define . the idea that individuals and groups emphasize their own ethnic or racial identities when we idenitics are in some way advantageous to them. 33. wecan define 'mffl. ' as a group defined by itself and others as distinct by virtue of perceived c'omrnon physicalcharacteristics that are held to be inherent. ' 34. We can define MW as a collectivity within a larger society having-realor putative common, 7 a . _. ancestry, memories of shared storical past, and a cultural focus on one or more symbolic. elements definchas *' '5 g '7 :' the epitome of their peoplehood. 35. We can define 553%; 333,53 as a process of interpenetration and fusion in which personsand groups; ' ' ‘- acquire the memories, sentiments, and attitudes of other persons or groups, and, by sharing theirexpcrienge. history, are incorporated with them in a common cultural life. , _ . ' -:_ . ' . hi ‘ 34°”! ' ' ' fly: “at! )'s and was reinforced under the system. 37. Briefly describe the significance of Plessy vs. Ferguson (1896). ' oi ' it r \ A“ - is: -' uncar- b in ' I ' [Li‘s _ ml ‘va 1.5 I. o...’ t - — . 38. Briefly describe the significance of L0 'g vs. Virginia (1 ° 7). .. _ - . , t in I. an tutu 5.5 A uteri us - u' ‘ to ca’ am“: not ___ . -’ 'T’I'i’ IA‘ ._ a . a. Attamm ’ - ‘ _ 4 39. Briefly describe the significance'of the Hart-Cellar Act of 1965 (Immigration Act), A 1‘ _ i I; t..." ' LA \‘i ' u ,n__g_. . A I It n - A ‘ 13v, " , l. I. a .- r3, ,4“ ye " .3... i. ‘ -.. " _ " 3;. II”. M ' i r 40. For years, the NAACP had hosted training meetings and discussion groups to find ways to overcome Jim . - ' Crow laws, challenged segregation in the courts, and campaigned vigorously against lynching; but the of TI and the release of his killers made it clear that something had to happen. Soon; And it did. On December 1, I 95 5, just three months after the trial of Bryant and Milam, Rosa Parks refitsed to surrender 7 her seat to a white person on a segregated Montgomery, Alabama, city bus. Her act of civil disobedience led to. ' the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the emergence of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as a powetfid leader in the fight for civil rights. Most historical accounts of the modem Civil Ri hts Maven: fit to the 1954 Supreme Court school integration decision'( Egan : vs. _ . . - ' e" onfgcwei? BUS 3W . as two events that kicked of the first large-scale campaign for equal rights, Injreality, the \ (same answer as théfirst blank) case is equally important. And, because of Rosa Parks and all who followed, Jim Crow laws » eventually became the subject of history instead of the law of the land. ,; t Whilsz Question (worth 10 points) Please answer only one of the following essay questions. Remember to support. your answer with evidence; You will be graded on the completeness of your answer, the ability to support your argument, and the overall. flow and style of the writing (note that you will 110th graded on spelling). A. What are the differences and/or similarities betWeen race and ethnicity? \ i I ll *- ,. 3 ‘wwrd’tw‘h Lt 7- - '. ' ' ‘Pr' bNLJM$+’-‘Wu" 5" ; B. Are immigrants a cost ora benefit to American society? F = . '1. fax." - n I It" ‘3 Didi! ‘7 ~ mama um, -. r - . a v- ." . O " 'lSOnL-‘m-“ L a A .' u o, t . m \' ‘ g I ._ . u 7!“. u M iI. * ' -. 00.0.. '1‘? 3 ("d 1 “21:4- 3_ Y «21 +0 ‘5' 0.. IL 'r (t. ' (‘4.- An’ A’ ‘ 5k + J u: mu “0.. a K a p H” 1 - it O' V.-N A .1 All}: I] an. . ,, l l n . lb H In : HAM “a an M ' ‘. TOP A' ' J. o w a. u - ‘ _ _ Ii..." ‘ Dre 0; MA I. ‘1 ..'¢ A ’_V.L. r 0‘ 7 l n . ' c. . - ’mt'a AA is“: ' ". ‘. I a ‘ “ V l m. u’ u- ' v 4 Lingual? , ' ' u A no.5 \ 2 . 4 Let: I ' -. I amen: i I‘ ' u .i-' . ' .OJL‘ \ IL’ "4’ A, l l t. “"24. a . WIL- ..I. - r" .‘ - in _ 25. Milton Gordon (in Assimilation in American Lifla) argues that complete assimilation will not take place until the absemetcfr f". l t the following types of assimilation. Which of the following is not one of these stages of assimilation in Gordon’s ' 'x ' a. Absence of value conflict I - . I ' ' " ' “ - Jr. Absence of prejudice - if ' ' 7 “Ge Absence of power conflict ‘ ‘ ' d/Absence of discrimination - - c. All of the above are stages of assimilation ' j v. g I 26. According to Milton Gordon (in Assimilation in American Lifiz), “Once ‘ assimilation has occurred, either ‘ I :‘1 > ‘ simultaneously with or subsequent to acculturation, all of the other types of assimilationP-Will'naturally follow.” Which of the l " I following answers is the m choice for the blank? ' -' '- a. Cultural ' a. Straight-line . . c. Structural ' . ' '- 5 u d. Segmented ' ’ e. Civic 27. Chicanos were by far the largest Mexican—descent grohp at Field High. They were mostly DES-born second and third+ ?" _' I - generation students whose primary loyalty was to their in-group. seen as locked in conflict with white-society. Chicanos ‘ '7‘ ' ' f ‘ I ' referred derisively to successful Mexican students as ‘schoblboys ” and “schoolgirls " or as "wannabes. ” To be a Chicano .. ' '1 meantin practice to hang out by the science wing...-not eating lunch in the quad where all the "gr-ingots " and "schodfioys "I I' hang out...cutting classes by faking acall slip so you can be with your fi'iends at 7-11 ...sitting in the back of classes and participatingunot carrying your books to class...not taking the diflicult classes...doing to minimum to get by; The above passage portrays one possible path of segmented assimilation. Which of the following choices Ms i-llustt‘ate5'this f j 5: 'I ‘ path? ‘ t . _. i _ - . . war-Upward assimilation (white middle class) b. Seiectivo assimilation (ethnic community) c. Downward assimilation (underclass) 28. Punjabi Sikhs in a northern California community managed to make considerable economic progress, as attested by fl " number who had becotne farm owners. while maintaining a tightly knit ethnic community. The material antisocial ' 31f created by this first-generation community compensated for, the absence of an older coethnic group and had decisive afiects on E - ' ‘ r ' second~generation outlooks. Pwy‘abi teenagers were shown-that their parents ’ ways paid Qfi'econornically, and thisfitct, plus ' their community ’s cohesiveness, endowed them with a source of pride to counteract outside discrimination. Punjabi Sikhs - ' appeared to be winning the race against the inevitable accelniration of their childrento American-snark aspiratioth I above passage portrays one possible path of segmented assimilation. Which of the-following choicesboit - a. Upward assimilation (white middle clasa) b. Selective assimilation (ethnic community) c. Downward assimilation (underclass) 29. The 1924 Immigration and Nationality Act is significant for a number of reasons. Which of the following choices is up; ' _ . one of those reasons? - - a ' . ' 7 " 2a.: It significantly slowed down immigration from most countries ‘ «be 'It used quotas based on the 1910 population census ' - flan-It discriminated heavily against the Southern and Eastern immigrants d. It did not place any restrictions on immigmnts from the Western hemisphere e. All of the above are reasons ' - . 30. Ruben Rumbaut’s typology of assimilation (in the article Social Assimilation) is different from Gordon's assimilation . '- model in a number of ways. Which one of the following answers in not a correct description of Rumbaut's typology? #He talked about Symbolic and'reactive ethnicities as of psychological assimilation b. He collapsed'marital assimilation into strucmral assimilation Q He posits that a segmented model is more accurate man‘straight-line model air-He points out that acculturation can be an additive and a subtractive process e. All of the above are correct descriptions ...
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This test prep was uploaded on 02/19/2008 for the course SOC 169 taught by Professor Morgan during the Spring '06 term at UC Irvine.

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Sociol169 S06 MIDTERM EXAM - 3 Multiracial Idjentities...

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