Ch_4_Notes_New-States_Paradox

Ch_4_Notes_New-States_Paradox - Quick Recap The Alabama...

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Quick Recap The Alabama Paradox - the number of seats increases - no changes in populations or # of states - a state loses a seat after re-apportioning Now let’s talk about the New-States Paradox . . . The Population Paradox - no changes in seats or # of states - the population of a state increases - the state loses a seat after re-apportioning
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Oklahoma became a state in 1907. Before Oklahoma became a state there were 386 seats in the House of Representatives. Oklahoma was apportioned 5 seats. This changed the number of seats from 386 to 391. The purpose of adding 5 seats was so that Oklahoma would have its fair share of seats and the other states would be unchanged. Another paradox shows up! Total Seats Maine NY Oklahoma 386 391 3 4 38 37 5 n/a
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courses during the next fall semester. There are now 28 class sections that will be scheduled due to the addition of the new course. It has been decided to use Hamilton’s Method to apportion
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This note was uploaded on 05/06/2008 for the course MATH 110 taught by Professor Pietro during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Fredonia.

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Ch_4_Notes_New-States_Paradox - Quick Recap The Alabama...

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