Verb Confusion

Verb Confusion - This is what my book said Directly from...

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Directly from the book, The Everyday Writer 3 rd edition “Distinguish between lie and lay, sit and set, rise and raise.” These pairs of verbs cause confusion because both verbs in each pair have similar- sounding forms and somewhat related meanings. In each pair, one of the verbs is transitive, meaning that it is followed by a direct object ( I lay the package on the counter ). The other is intransitive, meaning that it does not have an object ( He lies on the floor unable to  move ). The best way to avoid confusing these verbs is to memorize their forms and meanings. Base Form Past Tense Past Present -s Participle Participle Form Lie (recline) lay lain lying lies Lay (put) laid laid laying lays Sit (be seated) sat sat sitting sits Set (put) set set setting sets Rise (get up) rose risen rising rises Raise (lift) raised raised raising raises The doctor asked the patient to lay (replaced by lie) on his side. She sat (replaced by set) the vase on the table.
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Verb Confusion - This is what my book said Directly from...

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