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Ch_4_Notes_Alabama_Paradox

Ch_4_Notes_Alabama_Paradox - Hamilton’s Method seems...

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Unformatted text preview: Hamilton’s Method seems simple enough, problems can occur when this method is used repeatedly and changes are made. These problems do not occur often, Changes in: # of states # of seats population when they do, they create controversies about the fairness of the re-apportionment Throughout American history, the number of seats in the House of Representatives has increased. Suppose that one year a new census had not been taken, but Congress decides to ADD a seat to the House of Representatives. With the population unchanged, a re-apportionment is done. What do you think would happen? One state would gain a seat and the other states would remain the same. I t would make sense that adding a seat would result in one state gaining a seat and all other states keeping the number of seats they already have. Most of the time this occurs, sometimes the unexpected happens. 1882 – Congress was debating different apportionment bills Total Seats Alabama’s Seats 299 300 8 7 Texas and I llinois would...
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Ch_4_Notes_Alabama_Paradox - Hamilton’s Method seems...

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