HIS Response 1 - Joshua Huver 27 January 2008 T Campbell...

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Joshua Huver 27 January, 2008 T. Campbell HIS 1120 Response Question: How did the Hundred Years’ War, the Black Death, and the Great Schism in the church affect the course of history? Not often in history is there such a specific time period which holds so many significant events which directly affected the course of the world. The 14 th and early 15 th century time period is one which changed how people thought. Dealing with events such as the Hundred Years’ War, the Black Death, and the Great Schism, everything from the economy to the social structure changed in Europe, eventually leading to a new way of thinking which gave birth to the Renaissance. In May of 1337, midway through the 14 th century, a war started between England and France which would last until October of 1453 and be known as the Hundred Year’s War. France was bigger and more capable of fighting this war than England, yet somehow the British managed to hold onto French territory for a pretty long time. The one major difference between the French and the English was that the French had not quite assimilated into a single country from the numerous feudal states that previously made up the territories, but England had come together very well. This resulted in a more efficient infantry for the English. However towards the end of the War, along with the
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2008 for the course HIS 1120 taught by Professor Campbell during the Spring '08 term at Greensboro College.

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HIS Response 1 - Joshua Huver 27 January 2008 T Campbell...

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