Response Paper - To Build a Fire (Final)

Response Paper - To Build a Fire (Final) - Joshua Huver 14...

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Joshua Huver 14 February, 2008 ENG 1120 Wayne Johns Can Man Overcome Nature’s Most Extreme Conditions Alone? In Jack London’s short story “To Build a Fire,” he creates a stimulating narrative of a man traveling alone in the Yukon on his way to enjoy a delicious dinner with meet his family. It is this thought of dinner with his boys that continues throughout his head, and keeping him moving. Some may speculate whether this gathering place is full of his actual biological family, or just his best friends that he refers to as “the boys,” but either train of thought makes it easy to understand that both could very well be considered his family. As London draws out a story in which man faces nature in a quest of survival, the man, unnamed, ignores advice of older and wiser travelers and thinks he can do it himself. What he doesn’t realize is that often nature finds her way to win, and man simply cannot defeat nature alone. The story opens and right from the beginning London introduces one of the most prevalent and recurring themes in the story: the cold. A major part of life in the Yukon,
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Response Paper - To Build a Fire (Final) - Joshua Huver 14...

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