sleep apnea - Josh Huver Huver - 1 Mrs. Hanks Biology March...

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Unformatted text preview: Josh Huver Huver - 1 Mrs. Hanks Biology March 27, 2005 An In Depth Look At: Sleep Apnea The feeling of exhaustion one experiences even after a long night of rest is more than a mystery to some. For about 12 million Americans, however, they know exactly what's going on. More than likely its from a disorder called Sleep Apnea. The term is defined in The American Family Reference Dictionary as 'suspension of respiration; asphyxia.' for apnea, and sleep as 'to be dormant, quiescent, or inactive, as faculties.' It is most common for diabetic, overweight men around the age of 40, but anyone can be diagnosed. There are two major types of sleep apnea, Central Sleep Apnea and Obstructive Sleep Apnea, the most common being the latter. Nine out of ten people diagnosed with sleep apnea have Obstructive Sleep Apnea. There are many factors involved in the cause and treatment of sleep apnea, most of which will be explained further. For patients with obstructive sleep apnea, there is something blocking the trachea, the windpipe that brings air in and out of ones body. The uvula, the small piece of dangling flesh in the back of your throat, and a soft piece of tissue called the soft pallet collapse on the back wall of the upper airway. The tongue then falls backward, collapsing on the back wall of the upper airway. Together, these three items form a tight blockage, preventing any air from entering the lungs. The effort of the rest of the body to breathe only causes the blockage to seal tighter. To resume breathing, one must somewhat awaken, putting tension in all the muscles and freeing up the the body to breathe only causes the blockage to seal tighter....
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2008 for the course BIO 1000 taught by Professor Hanks;hall during the Spring '08 term at Greensboro College.

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sleep apnea - Josh Huver Huver - 1 Mrs. Hanks Biology March...

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