English 8 F98 MIDTERM EXAM -Major American Writers

English 8 F98 MIDTERM EXAM -Major American Writers -...

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Unformatted text preview: English 8 Major American Writers Mid-term exam May 5! Define and/or identify (30) the brook? The Bunch Ed OverbrookV/ the Unpardonable Sin FD‘ the rosebud V/v ~ Vergil Gunch (b "The Purple Land“/' San Fermin// moonlight in the Custom Belmonte House II. In a brief ara ra h. discuss the significance of each below (#0) ‘ Ps1: 03‘ The Good Citizens' League?! Jake's love for bullfighting , [4' the scaffold standardization W) the condition and code of Hemingway's nature? the lost generation Seneca Doane Hawthorne's concept of romance{ III.C)In both Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and Lewis's Babbitt there exist communities or societies that have dominant _ I» ‘\ puritan strands—-strands that deny man's animal parts. ,g9{%p: Identify these strands. How do they manifest themselves 057 \J/ in the two novels? What are their possibilities and CO \ limitations? How do they accommodate, repress, or deny man's individual wants, desires, instinct, and passions? EDHemingway has his lost generation and Lewis has his bohemians-- two groups who find themselves marginal to the conventional values, mores. and principles of the dominant society. Compare and contrast the two authors' portraits of these two marginal groups. L "-:;f‘ English 8 Major American Writers Hogue/Harris Final Examination an a, I. Identify and/or Define (30) V/alaise V:éhe Eagle Watchers Society 1gonghair he rat uSam Yerger ' House Made of Dawn" 1 atton cfepetition (V/‘everend Hammond vDick Brown. II. Discuss each below in brief paragraphs (40) r/{vaerydayness” in the Moviegoer. 7 ‘What is the "Search" in the Moviegoer? fi/ngescribe Father Olguin's relationship to the revervation The significance of Abel's final run (énghe significance of Angela's stay at Walatowa quhat does Bigger mean when he says, "...what I killed for, I aml“? H¥Why does Bigger feel free after accidently killing Mary Dalton? fi§What constitutes the "new breed" in McCarthy's The Grqpp? (5"D1scuss the four basic elements of naturalism v/Eln The Group what influence does McCarthy think wealth and ideas ha‘ on these girls' lives? III. Choose one from below and write an essay (30) 1. Binx and Bigger are two existential characters who are in search of self. Locate the origin of their search. Then, compare and contrast the features and characteristics of their existential state. What make the two different from other individuals in their families? Finally, is their search successful? 2. In both The Group and House Made of Dawn, Mary McCarthy and N. Scott Momaday respectively give us characters—- Abel, HelenaJ'Priss, and Lakey—-who fail to penetrate "mainstream" American society. Discuss these failures. Why are they failures? What kinds of comments are McCarthy and Momaday making about society? ENGLISH 7--MAJOR BRITISH AUTHORS FROM WORDSWORTH TO JOYCE FALL, 1988 MIDTERM EXAMINATION Answer six of the following questions. being sure to answer at least one about Wordsworth, Shelley. Dickens. and James. You should aim in your answers at being as clear, coherent. and concise as possible--as we}! as legible. Ideally, you might expect to answer each question in a paragraph of a few sentences. Always make your answers as specific as you can and wherever possible point to the precise language of the text in question or precise features of its structure (such as plot) to provide evidence for your readings. 1. Explain as fully--but also as concisely--as you can the line "I ought to be thy Adam. but I am rather the fallen angel. whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed." *3? 2. What accounts for Oliver's reaction to Noah when the latter taunts him about his mother? How. that is, might we fit this uncharacteristic (and perhaps "unrealistic") episode into a reading of the romance-plot of the novel? Are there other "unrealistic" details of Oliver’s story that parallel this episode? 3. What is the context for the lines "Shades of the prison—house begin to close / Upon the growing Boy" and how do you read them? Why "Shades"? Why “L "prison—house"? 4. Briefly compare and contrast Oliver and the Artful Dodger. Is there some point we may draw from the comparison? 3 5. "It's beyond everything. Nothing at all that I know touches it." "For sheer terror?" I remember asking. He seemed to say it was n't so simple as that; to be really at a loss how to qualify it. He passed his hand over his eyes. made a little wincing grimace. "For dreadfui--dreadfulness!" , "Oh how delicious!" cried one of the women. He took no notice of her; he looked at me, but. as if. instead of me. he saw what he spoke of. "For general uncanny ugliness and horror and pain." Comment on some features of this passage that seem to you characteristic of the text in which it appears. How does it echo or anticipate the work's themes and/or methods? 6. Who is Monks and how does his story relate to the larger plot of the work in which he appears? a 7. His creature is pretty clearly a double of Victor Frankenstein. Identify one other double of Victor's in thenovel and briefly compare and contrast him or her with the protagonist. 'gc LOVW‘N‘ 8. What is unexpected in the formula "The Child is father of the Man"? Paraphrase the line to show as fully as you can what it is actually claiming about the relation between childhood and adulthood. How are the connotations of the word "father" relevant to its claim‘hx 9. Relate some aspects of the character of Mrs. Grose and explain how these might figure in the question of whether or not we are to believe in the reality of the governess's ghosts. t- 10. In what sense is the youth addressed by the poet "Nature's Priest" 9; "best Philosopher"? i 11. I thought I saw Elizabeth. in the bloom of health, walking in the streets of Ingolstadt. Delighted and surprised. I embraced her, but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death; her features appeared to change. and I thought that I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her form, and I saw the grave—worms crawling in the folds of the flannel. Explain the context of this passage. What details in it seem to you to call out for interpretation? What does the passage suggest in its context about the "I"? THIS EXAMINATION MUST BE RETURNED WITH YOUR ANSWERS. PLEASE ENCLOSE IT WITH YOUR BLUE BOOK(S}. ...
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This test prep was uploaded on 02/19/2008 for the course ENG 8 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '98 term at UC Irvine.

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English 8 F98 MIDTERM EXAM -Major American Writers -...

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