ce305 burj Dubai paper

ce305 burj Dubai paper - Nicholas Barnhart CE 305 Technical...

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Nicholas Barnhart CE 305 Technical Paper February 18, 2008 The New Babel and Its Tower For almost four thousand years, the Great Pyramid of Giza reigned supreme as the tallest structure in the world. A testament to the might of the Egyptian empire, the Great Pyramid asserted, by its shear magnitude, the dominance of Middle Eastern culture over the rest of the world. In 1311 AD, the Lincoln Cathedral in London took the title of tallest structure in the world away from the Great Pyramid and away from the Middle East. For the next seven hundred years many nations have flexed their industrial muscles to compete for structural dominance. Russia, France, China, Taiwan, and the United States of America are just a few of the nations who have over the years held the title of tallest building or tallest structure, but never in seven centuries has the title returned to the Middle East. The Burj Dubai hopes to change that. Scheduled for completion in late 2008, the Burj Dubai is already the tallest man- made structure in the world and upon completion will become the tallest building in the world. Though the final height is not yet released, the tower will be at least 700m (2,297ft) which would surpass the current record holder,
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Taipei 101 by 200m (656ft). This modern marvel is a mark of the returning might of the oil rich Middle East. Though most of the region is plagued by civil unrest, social upheaval, and economic strife, Dubai is one of a small number of wildly opulent economic hot spots, fueled by oil revenues, which has made the Middle East a center for business and pleasure for people from every corner of the globe. To understand such an enormous and significant project, there are several aspects of the Burj Dubai which must be examined. This paper will discuss three main aspects of the tower; its structural and technical complexity, the significance of its standing as the tallest building in the world and future competitors, and its economic and social viability and impact. One of the most important structural considerations for all tall, slender buildings, and particularly for the Burj Dubai, is wind forces. The Y-shape of the tower was specifically designed to reduce the force of wind on the structure. Also, the terracing of the different levels was designed to redirect or “confuse” the wind so that it can not have a sustained force on the whole building. This is achieved because as the wind strikes the building it encounters several different widths and shapes, thus the wind vortexes can never be properly arranged on the tower 2
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to give a uniform force. The reinforced concrete design of the tower is also highly resistant to wind. The tower functions as a central high performance concrete core which is buttressed by the wings of the building. Each of these wings also has a high performance concrete core and is further supported by perimeter columns. This design produces a structure which is highly resistant to the torsional force caused by wind. To determine the potential
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2008 for the course RS 101 taught by Professor Seanblevins during the Spring '08 term at University of Tennessee.

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ce305 burj Dubai paper - Nicholas Barnhart CE 305 Technical...

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