Physics Formal Lab Report

Physics Formal Lab Report - Mark DeWitt Partner: Physics...

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Mark DeWitt Partner: Physics 128, Section 31 GSI: Mallory Traxler Determination of the Charge-to-Mass Ratio of the Electron Introduction: In this experiment, we used a cathode ray tube similar to that of a television to study the properties of electrons. The purpose of this lab was to measure the charge-to-mass ratio (e/m) of an electron based on the behavior of an electron beam. We observed the motion of charged particles in the form of an electron beam under a constant magnetic field, under a constant electric field, and under both constant magnetic and electric fields. In order to perform this experiment, we used an electron beam tube with a grid, an electron accelerating high voltage power supply, a cathode low-voltage power supply, an electrostatic deflection plate HV supply, a set of insulated HV power leads, a pair of matched solenoid electromagnet coils, an electromagnetic DC power supply for the Helmholtz coils, a stand for the cathode ray tube and Helmholtz coil pair, and a digital ammeter to read the Helmholtz coil current. Magnetic Deflection: Objective: This part of the experiment showed how the motion of charged particles in the form of an electron beam was affected by a constant magnetic field. The goals were to measure an overall mean value of e/m and to compare this value to the accepted e/m value. Procedure: We adjusted I B slightly for three specific values of V a : 2500 V, 3000 V, and 3500 V. Data:
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Physics Formal Lab Report - Mark DeWitt Partner: Physics...

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