Lab Report 4 - Projectile Motion

Lab Report 4 - Projectile Motion - Projectile Motion...

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Projectile Motion Physics 101
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Introduction: In this experiment we were asked to perform a series of trials that involved projectile motion and in turn, were asked to analyze and draw several conclusions about projectile motion. In order to properly perform and calculate projectile motion we shot a ball out of a spring-loaded cannon clamped on the side of a table and using a piece of carbon paper laid over a piece of computer paper with a coordinate system on it, we were able to determine where the ball landed. Using this setup we then proceeded to calculate the initial velocity of the ball after being shot horizontally at three different settings: small, medium, and large. After determining the average range (displacement in the x- direction) of the ball at each setting we then proceeded to calculate the initial velocity for each setting on the spring-loaded cannon. We were then asked to set the cannon to an angle of 35º above the horizontal and then, after choosing to use the results given from the medium setting, dissected the initial velocity of the ball launched at medium into x and y components. Using these values we then plugged them into the equation solving for range and afterwards used the range value to determine the initial velocity of the launch at 35º. We were then asked to actually perform the launch at 35º and compare our results of range to the range we calculated algebraically. Having previously calculated the initial velocity of the ball at 35º we then used this value to determine the angle at which the ball should be launched in order to travel 3.21 meters. After obtaining the angle needed and testing our theory by shooting the ball at this angle, we then concluded our experiment. Using the results from these experiments we were able to show how projectile motion can be solved with limited information. Procedure: For our first experiment we set up the cannon so it was horizontal, thus making the angle of launch zero. After measuring the height of the cannon in reference to the ground we then shot the ball at the small setting, marked where it landed, and then laid the carbon paper over the area of impact. We then measured the vertical distance from the cannon’s end to the ground, giving us our height value. We also took the time to measure from right below the cannon’s end to the coordinate system underneath the carbon paper. This value then gave us our range (x displacement) for the “small” setting.
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