English 103 Fall - 2000 Midterm

English 103 Fall - 2000 Midterm - .2? m’ ' ' um I. ‘....

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Unformatted text preview: .2? m’ ' ' um I. ‘. .3' r _ I. Identify in one or 2 sentences: (1’) min.) You Britons. I A- dirfifigws a a ‘3?“ “2 W19 Mu 2d. MVflmPWLSf’m/IS We 56:; «Weir‘s/film? ' ' W - ‘ {fir W ( I , \ Ll ' fw M3 “buétfl’zm’i (1% CW2 Tee, M” Q‘wamf TVHr'g/M-F ’ nurses (in I Ma JWWJJS veg» 4-de 4; Answer on the sheet. ‘ W’me st m Want A; gtm mama, W B. "That as I said, I say, take 0rd, y're thineT/TW- ‘---"“-"-------~s~~tZ-AL , I piecemeale pass to Glory bright in them."fib Wm)“ wave lgwywxx“ [M [Death‘s/f we. but MAW/M- may; +1- 43 wake-vermw‘ ~ ' “will, '“fl 5 ' f” L w b (43 19014399.»; ,‘afl’fie a +4.? “I 6091‘s w? _ Mn t {1.3 firtan m firming V F s W'Wses” or "Application'l/(mw Keg, w W *K‘ 'er-rvmodc v54 kgeflw - mi} N 1 s -— 9 WM_95{' " etDV‘W v ,ci m W; M W m 5% MP W WW“ AW 9 , m "'i'vF'etHschi/é at “A?” J C!“ ’2 J 7 Wings? Ly . "If two he one. as surely thou and I, I go {'42: PUH‘AIWJ Wflw ,, a)?! How stayest thou there, whilst I at Ipswich lie?" r1952 Wx'c’a- bum/C‘s WWW M WWW album *7” “W OW‘W’“’5 W ‘ 2 an m we) 0m, won We 4w Mama/2%; bh/U- m; 4 cu, church .r-”"""“' ale fife—eh" . l m7 E. Cevenant of Grace WWZVLWW; fifty WMUZHW 073 W (’1 WNW ~ Hit WWW Ali/99 mm? . «(La a—védr- 5 Ohms”; Mavl'vlfiaw W QQLCQ*>,F?‘;ZT% a bf 9M5 (Pb M7“ 90 W W] 71" 91vbe Wyatt £43? Qgivgfiwrt’hvmh Chflé’i WHOM '5‘ F. "Your wickedness makes you a it were eavy as lead, and to tend downwards with“ $53M?) greatueight and pressure towards hell; and if God should let you go, you woulW' immediately. 31M swifth descend and plunge intethe bottomless gulf ...." 4 1‘0 1’ Jam/M, WM ; Emu We Weakly; Manama so 34 g/ Cram/La; {W92 bat/Lemma Vq‘wém W MW 91m Mad/WW \ we w? was Uv/dflifllflfimc 059M . W a )fems \ a _ II Essay (40 minutes) - do A or B G'EWL' 6“ ‘ M49 Wm9597 WW APPleW ‘ —- “Qatar Db é gas/man’wa w = m «>st ‘yw’ch‘ A. In class we have mentioned all of the following as among the c acteristics of WW“1 mm Puritan literature: , 3‘“ ' 1. interest in the individual _ 2. moment in literature from the concrete 1:: everyday to the abstract and moral __ _ or eternai. '5. constant attention both 0 the present moment a: the eternal A. plain style 'T‘o this list you may add '5- any other characteristic you define as central to Puritan literature Then. choose $13 of the above. and write an essay in which you examine that characteristic in depth (what are the reasons for it, what in practice does it r9511? men-etc. 1110111ng in the essay an eternnation of how the characteristic appears in the works of at least t_w_g_ of the authors you have studied. Be as specific as possible. B. "We say that a habit of vivid realistic description, interest in the happenings of the everyday and particular are characteristic of the Puritan. That's hog-wash. The Puritan never say; the world around him. All he saw was God, Hell, Eternal Verities. He Wasn't interested in the present—and most of what we've celled 'vivid images drawn from everyday life' are really images drawn from g}_d_ Testament 'everydey life.‘ " Agree, disagree, or qualify, but support your answer with discussions of at least two of the authors you have studied. Be as specific as possible. :04) (MO/(5b Wfl’M/u PWWIQ Milk/W83} W wmat Way/W? W \4, MW .cm Emma: Wm meet mgmmkemww wLM/LLWMV WmteEs/Lm as, 7 _ _ (“Vi/VI . 435% > 4'75-‘7'7'3'7 M/L “Q “A ) WW gmgfey. QWUI/mmj mm W paw, me/Lu/ mm M. 0% m mch W “hug Mia-92%, m ‘m/E9 WW AmmW/L , PW QM m7? WM Wéw-M WWI/£6 wH/m cal/m1; * ALL La;ng WM Maxi” Wm W, W . QM ' = ‘ " vb ' 9Q ngwfl V Wm M «W, fag/gawk 60°) 00" sq .h? I ‘ ,_ ‘ ; 5 EnglishEIOS: American Realism and Naturalism E John Howe, winter Quarter, 1988 Midterm Examination: February 16, 1988, 9:30-10:50 Q.M. _m”__ liegtiggs. The midterm is open book, but Qgt‘open notes. Budget your time carefully. Follow the directions For lies must arises: been sects Qf the eiaeioatiee- Part 13 lgegtiiigatiggs. Identify Q of the following a by author, work, and significance +or the work, the author, and/or the subject of American realism and naturalism. 1335;: 20 MINUTES VALUE: 25 z OF THE MIDTER’M GRADE 1, The Franco—Prussian war 3: V’E. Persis Brand 9/3. hrs. Bread 4. “What the South needed . . . was skilled labor. Without that it would be unable to develop its mines, build its roads, work to advantage and without great waste its fruit+ul land, establish manufactures or enter upon a prosperous industrial career. Its laborers were almost altogether unskilled. Change them into intelligent, trained workmen, and you increased at once the capital, the resources 04 the entire south, which would mater upon a prosperity hitherto unknown.” [lungkd ilfigf 5. The Great Lacustrine and Polar Railroad L/a. Colonel Selby p/flf. Bartley Hubbard 8. A deathbed confession CbThtmécxz~\;? Egg; LL: Ehggt Essays. Answer two of the following questions with essays of about thirty—minutes each. 11mg: 1 HOUR (30 HINS./ESSAY) gauge: 75 2 OF MIDTERH GRADE 1. The romances of Philip Sterling and Ruth Bolton, Tom Corey and Penelope Lapham seem to serve just about the same purposes in_their respective novels: distract us occasionally tram the\\weightier social issues. Perhaps for these very r-Hlliif‘lfiélrl “Edi-1‘5!“ the conclusions 0% both romances are rather disturbing in conjunction with the moral lessons 04 the novels in which they appear. Compare and contrast the ways these two romantic subplots support or detract from the moral reforms suggested by the works in which these romantic subplots respectively appear. reasons, 2. Both Silas Lapham and Christopher Newman pertorm various acts of charity, and it is o+ten this very “charity” that gets each character into trouble. Select one tangible act of charity per¥ormed by each character as a way of assessing Howells‘ and James's respective views of philanthropy. Is there anything peculiar about the “philanthropy” o¥ a capitalist like Lapham or Newman? 3. Laura in Ihe Qilgeg age and Noemie Nioche in Ihe emegigag have much in common. In one Way or another, each is "tatherless” and ends up taking charge 0+ her own destiny. In what ways do Laura and Noemie reflect the “corruptions” of the ages in which they are living w— and that their authors are at such pains to expose in the hopes of correcting? are Laura and Noemie fundamentally different? In what ways w .{b 'c:>i; ?EQF; fiiflfifi ‘ " , ' " (7x555 ;€-::*;'.a4;..: k‘ égfim fig“; 7 fiaagm'mm 5; 1987 W‘”“""" - .. 13 FF I N“ Wat Tharg ara :hre$ garma to fihis azmm find there are instructinaa for each yarq ymu should teaé narafaily. A little less than half of the next cighty minute: can ha éavo&efl to tha first $w0“partaa You will want 38 least forty minatea for your assay Bazaar (which you ahould plan out carefully)» Hotice also that Part I} 13 u¢rth twica as aamy points as Part I. Though you should d0 From I and 11 as faat ea poefiible, keep in 31nd that in points they rem present mines: half aha exam mad that you will nuafi to do reasonably wcli an thwm to get & decent grade on the exam. (Try for spraafi axons all the novela in your gnawera on tha first tag part3.) sum-'1- I. Ideazifinatiams. Briefly identify l2 nf the following by role or significanca and the bogk in which the pereon fir ohject appears uniega thm figrm reifirs ta historical backgrouné and that backgroumd has specifia referenaz in mug of tha booka. ORE POINT 2&CE. ’1. Moliy Saagria “é. Xury 3. Stuarts 9%] éfitn' rJOJW IS“ 26 Fests ’3 aeeas of corn 4. Dr. 31m; H8. '50rtu3uese m&m caprgim P’fin J. firnalfl . °‘ an. M11 mum: .— Boestq W :oue 0F MUTWEE‘ZQ ~13. a fiull in tha gastuxa v12. Fartrifiga v13. Quwkere £6. a trip ta Stamfazé ‘15» E3“ Dgwliag v{%. fiha fiastarfltiom vi7. Hanewgrianm 13¢ “indefaaaibia king $Ed l@wd" ’19. tke waif Zfia Mr. Lamgnaa {1'} PART II. Shem: answer. idmtitimtions. Mentifyiaxphm the significance of 10 of the teaming in a, fem: museums. 3 POINTS RACE 1.. 3'11: of Rights and Act of Qattlancnt M 2. m me "new" 47¢? a (m mind. $1M Sui-5 40 MM EFWL pm Ma; (33% 3:15 imam,me figuWL—waLW ; 3. Di'éiae Risk ‘mm Al»; lutism ‘ , /6. Solitude "Hm W of, m) wwmafi.‘ LHaus bwrpwplctgmm 2’ 5. status insomiaccmcy _ 6.: tbs we "fit. 3 “" Juaompbfi r N- '5 an metfijo Mai ” m are m mafia; w’him « A! ‘ ‘ 14. fiWIQIuéJuq . m: cameras-ma; aituatmas mm: in t a m a male Qua m and what 1:: chair aignificancm? ‘ Weranu e. salfwsentmeni—“IGT any. of guf—rdledum Cwscrmsnasc ,PWFW MW 5’5 9. batth with wakme "5:661! 6‘ ’10, mar“ much as "geflKAMgn" mfii “honour” ’11; joumalu’wfitmfi 475% WW5 M1 bmks ,, 4.2. Susan 13. Square and Manhunt 215. “strange comm-tenet; sf daya“ ’WQSS‘ x15.‘ what in "mama" with Jyanny Jfi'ileJ—B? mm: 111. Essay Question (53 E’OI‘M‘SL Chm-95¢ 9&3: a: the humming mentions in: an essay: UM: the gnawing“: to fiiacuafi at; laws: :11: first thus: of our sac-vale: in as much fiatai'é as powaibla. but do the has: you can on. firm: 3am. (I will Map in mm when fact that we‘ve only begun in: in $123923.) Vi; Despita the farmnl variaty of these naveiag nné clue: and character differences in protageniatw and the “pints” cf their stories, tbara 1% at least one large aimiiarity in paafarn. Rabinaon, Roxana, Panala. and ?om each begin their lives 3nd receiva their education within a ahnlL-re6 "gumréian“ attucturew In gach casa, at some paint, this guardian utmscfiure in? 951346413139“ ream-med and. «and: prafiagmaist: mat sanahaw reconstituta zheix warld and thamnalvaa—wmociety anfi macinll palitinal islationahipm. the sauna nfifi ruleg cf agiatencea and even their identities. Biacman thig pafitarm in same flaaail for each of thm beaks. What are tha imylimationa of this gattaru, its lmtgar resonancea in the worm thaw Fromm-sari mac“; “cm:z:umad"_ meme: mum? 1m; .5, q wtwsma WT 1:] {fiagfafi amen qg 3:6)— 3 go mg c5575“ 35 $5 3. The noveln we have fined as far do not atmply prenant a story or narraaivn. but mien in one any or another call attention to thn process. circnnnrennea, reasonsfl prablems, and cannequences of the any the: story comes into bning. They may offer figurative nadela for arnry making or the function of stories. poaeible rules at principles for the interpretation of amoriee. In mare than one case, the protagonints are actually involvad 1n the making of "fictiann" or "glare." (In these cases. for whet raucous. and how are these "fictions" meant to function? What needs are they meant to seciefy?) Each novel can be seen. in feet. to provide anggeaticne about the Enactioni purpose, and reading of stories and the necessity of making than that coulé in one any or another he appliefi to at considerad analogcne to the text itself. Another any of thinking abnnt thin inane might be to ask in what ways are the acta of writing or reading, literally a: figurasively. eeeentiel $9 each of the basin? Em what may: do theta narrativna call attention to the fan: that they Egg writinga that they are tax:- or books? A specific nxnnplnz' Although thin nativity may Beau morn nubtie or limited in Dnioa'a navels, such is an: the can: with Eggele. What done it mean to any that writing and reaflfing are anong the host important §g§;§gg or p10: nvangg in Eggggg? And if this description holdn true for the writing nnfl reading of the letters that nnke up thifi novel, if it is the reading (ené proper understanfiing) of these letters that effucte the chfinge that brings about tha awccesaful rnaalntion of the tensions ané conflict of its plea. what are the implicetionn of this fact for the reading of chn novel by Richerdson'l contemporaries in? for that mattnr, by us)? What Gael this fact suggest about the funcfiion 9f the naval itself? 5R inxPOrtincc. What in the nayrnenee of Bnnirm, hnw in it defina and how dens 1: function in the “fable” qf 3.9 manner/ninvn dialectic 1n Hegel (as read by Knieva)? Eating the fiifferanceefi. haw done dnaire, defined in this any. function in §g§§§§23_firunon. prnna, nné Pamela? In what wayr éann Egawggnen fiiffar um thin point? Does desira have aha gnmn inscxtancn in tha larger novel? find: are the implicatians 0% thin differencn? Egan shn fact thet for Kojene. at least, the Hegalian masterfslnve dialectic servan an the crigin of hwmnn culture and annietywuinflaedg of the human an euchu-ann éoea the rule efi higtnry susguat anything abuut the significance or ezylmnntoxy pcwar in has for tanning these navnln or abnur the gcnqral impartance nf thmir concernn? W As one of aheae differencen, yam might Hen: to consider the folluwiag prmynnitiqn: In Eanalafi aha ureter must discnvar and came :0 know himeaif shynugh $he “subjectivity” of the niave {dialecticnlly} nné thraugh the filave's value structure. flew does tkin ginseng work nnfi what nrn flan essential features? ($1 In this regardr ggmela night ba confiiderad a3 fiha trum (revised a? rev1$ionist) asqual to the original canfrontmtion as autlinaé by Ecjaveiflngal» Emu might want to an on to-con— aide: fine implicationa of thu fact that all theme nations at aaii-consciouanesm and selfiwpreaence of the identity at the “1" are theroughly textualized is these fioaka-uthat they are “effects” or "profiucts" of texts. what da rnading. writing. and tag making of storiem hmve $0 &a with the self. identity, at fianize? 5H [ FINAL EXAM ENGLISH 103 The Rise of The Novel G 1 \ Prof. Homer Brown December 8, 1987 k Identify text, role etc. and/or explain in one sentence 19 of the following. (25 minutes, 20 points) I. Brief Identifications 1. Mrs. Fitzpatrick 2. The Glorious Revolution 3. Mr. Williams 4. Blaize Castle 5. Arabella Hunt 6. an old goat in a cave 7. Mrs. Allen 8. Eugenius 9. Supple 10. Bobby ll. Namur 12. "I never read novels; I have something else to do." 13. Susannah's green satin nightgown 14. parabola and hyperbole 15. Name three novelists mentioned in Northanger Abbey 16. Captain Tilney II. Short Answer Write a short paragraph of explanation on each of 2 of the following. (50 minutes, 40 points) (Try for as many different novels as possible in your choices.) 1. Implications of the differences between Richardson's and Fielding's modes of narration. 2. Four examples of story or fiction construction in the novels we have read and, briefly, their significance in those books and their time. 3. "Minute causes" and unintended or unforeseen effects in Tom Jones. 4. What pattern in Tom Jones do the following events exemplify: Square discovered behind Molly's bed, Tom's encounter with Molly the night Allworthy begins to recover, Mrs. Western's "discovery" about Sophia's "true" love? Name one other example of this pattern. 5. Name three "accidents" traumatizing the conception, birth or growing up of Tristram. III. 10. Explain the implications of the gender references in the first chapter of Northanger Abbey. Explain the significance of the "documents" Catherine finds in her room at the abbey. Explain the larger implications of the picture of contemporary society drawn by Henry Tilney in his speech rebuking Catherine for her suspicions about his parents. The problem of language and/or communication in Tristram Shandy and one other novel. The Man of the Hill. Essays (50 minutes, 40 points) Choose two of the following topics for brief essays. Focus your discussions as much as possible on particular scenes or episodes, use as much detail as you can but interpret the detail, try to make clear the larger implications of the episodes or themes and their significance for the book they are taken from and in terms of cultural aniggeneric themes we have discussed. (You may if you wish choose 92; item from Part II for one of these essays, but the two options you choose for this part should involve different novels.) Roxana's debate with her merchant lover about marriage. Education and the meaning of the words in either Pamela, Tom Jones, or Northanger Abbey, with brief reference to the other two. One of the scenes or episodes-involving Tom'sfimistaken'point of "honour." (cite at least three others.) Sophia's bird. Mrs. Western's campaign to get Sophia married to Blifil and the argument with Squire Western. The relationships between the 1745 Rebellion, Stuart claims and ideology, the Glorious Revolution, and the stories of Tom and Sophia. Henry's and Catherine's first dance and the pattern of their relationship that follows. The relationships (and their implications) between the defense of novels by Northanger Abbey's narrator, reading and misreading in the course of the book, the conversation about histories, Catherine's suspicions about General Tilney and her "correction" by Henry, and the opposition between "romance" and "the anxieties of ordinary life." "*‘-—~ £E;<::u{:\‘:*>\ l£:?£!£ ‘ u If? English 103: American Realism and Naturaliam John Rowe. Winter Quarter. 1988 Final Examination=-Thur5day, March 24, 8:00 ~ 10:00 A.M. The examinations is open book, but not open notes. Follow the directions {or both parts. Part I. Identi+icatione. Identity Q oi the +ollowing IQ items aogording to author, work, and eignificance for the author and/or work. TIME: 40 MINUTES (5 MINUTES PER I-D-): EQLQE: 1/3 OF THE FINAL EXAMINATION GRADE. V/l. "Mrs. Lloyd” “<2. Bob Ames V/g. Jim Conklin 4. Frederic Chopin u/S. An evening walk at Bellomont _/6. The Casino at Monte Carlo v’7. Lola 9/8. The Battle 0? Chancellorsville? 9:“Madame-Antoine‘e 9/10. Sim Rosedale Eat; Ll. Eseave. Answer 99th of the eeeay questions, exercising your option; when available. The Firet eesay involves three worke and should thue involve a somewhat more detailed answer. TIME: 50 MINUTES FOR THE FIRE” ESSAY: JO MINUIEB FOR THE SECOND: yetg‘ . OF THE FINAL EXAMINATION GRADE (DIVIDED: 42 2 FOR THE FIRST ESSAY: 25 2 ?OR THE SECOND ESSAY) 1. (LONG ESSAY). A Speculative economy depends upon. must even leigge in the element o? ghaflce. Were there no chance, then there would be nothing to be gained (and. of course, nothing to “ventUFe”). Each of the worke we have read Since the midterm depends in some significant way on chance: War in The Egg Badge of Cgufiggg, extramarital romance (and a “new life”) in Ihg Agageging. the "occaeipn“.For Hurstwood‘s theft in gigter gaggle. and a host of important events (Lily's gambling, the ruin 04 her father. chance meetings and Sightings. and Lily‘e death itselF) in figuee discuss in the precedinq essay question, *‘_m._*_____ , Mmerican Realism Mm what appears as "chance" to the characters, however, is of a very coherent social narrative as far as the authors are concerned. That is, what seems to be an “accident” to the characters is often understood by the reader as perfectly consonant with the social order portrayed by the author. Select one sessilis smasle at of this3 Sort iH of the four— novels ‘we have studied since the midterm. Identify L35 significance for the main themes of the work and then eflplain how this apparent “accident” is at least partially determined by the . k. u 4-— h ., . fi—fi' a" soCial values represented in the novel. If you have time, draw , flnfic____-____-__r_u_m j__~“____m_“_.l.___c_._“,c- some conclusions about the role of “chance” in naturalism and realism, identifying your examples according to your judgment of their “realist” or “naturalist” qualities. m ' Mde ~ M, a?" LJ'fl atoll; Cat/ch, Wm WM“ mm; claim i2. (SHORT ESSAY). In the course of American industrialization, family relations changed dramatically. In each of the novels we have studied since the midterm, the traditional “nuclear” family (parents and children living together) seems to have failed in its purpose of providing parental role models for the children, educating children to become responsible adults, and transmitting a healthy balance of respect for the past and a desire TDF positive changes/reforms. Begin with the one_work you_ did NOT mthen select another work studied since the midfesm—eae comparison and contrast. Although you certainly may wish to deal wfth natural family relations, you might also consider surrogate parents (officers in Bed flagge, Mlle. Reisz or Mme. Ratidnolle in Ihe fiwafiening, Mrs. Vance in Sister Carrie, Hunt Peniston and others in _guse of mirth). Your firYEEFyWBGFEbse is to show how thELDetural or _urroyate family has +§QJJ£LJILJ$5_i£astiQflfilmpuf905953 but you might also want to say something about how such failures reflect larger social issues. _.__—__,,_,c__—._.__i-—_.c..-_ __.._,fi “7‘; 4., _ is... Mew-bl. 11 a xth ufflmyxcrth:} ...
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English 103 Fall - 2000 Midterm - .2? m’ ' ' um I. ‘....

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