Virginia’s Civil War Generals - Virginias Civil War...

This preview shows page 1 - 6 out of 15 pages.

Virginia’s Civil War Generals BY ALEJANDRO ARANGO
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

Lewis A. Armistead Born on February 18, 1817 in New Bern, North Carolina Armistead was raised by a father who was also a soldier, along with his 4 uncles. Armistead entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1833, but academic difficulties and poor lead to his resignation in 1836. Three years later Armistead returned to the army as a second lieutenant in the 6th Infantry Regiment and served primarily in garrison duty in the West Armistead entered Confederate service on September 15, 1861, with the rank of major, but two weeks later he was promoted to colonel and given command of the 57th Virginia Infantry He fought during the Seven Days Battles in June and July 1862, but played only minor roles at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. On July 3, 1863, he led a brigade in George Pickett’s division during the charge at Gettysburg. Armistead’s men attacked Hancock’s corps at the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge. Armistead was mortally wounded in the charge and died 2 days later, on July 5 th , 1863 Lee recognized him as being good and appointed him provost marshal for the army.
Image of page 2
Jubal Early Born on November 3, 1816 He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1837. He resigned from the army on July 31, 1838, to study law, and began his practice in Rocky Mount in 1840. Early was a delegate to the Virginia Convention of 1861 prior to Virginia’s secession After Virginia seceded from the Union in May 1861, Early was appointed a general in the state militia, then a colonel in the Confederate army, becoming the first commander of the 24th Virginia Infantry Regiment. He commanded a Virginia brigade at the First Battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861. He then was promoted to brigadier general, At the Battle of Williamsburg on May 5, 1862, he attacked a superior force without support, lost many men, and was wounded. He temporarily commanded the division of Richard S. Ewell, who had lost a leg at Second Manassas. Early died on March 2, 1894 after falling down the stairs He served under Stonewall Jackson’s command
Image of page 3

Subscribe to view the full document.

Henry Heth Born at Black Heath, in Chesterfield County, Virginia, on December 16, 1825, into a family with a solid military pedigree. Heth was denied entrance to the U.S. Naval Academy and instead was graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1847. He also served during the Mexican War. Before Virginia’s succession, he was fighting Native Americans on the western frontier After Virginia's succession, Heth resigned his U.S. Army commission and briefly headed the state's quartermaster department before assuming command of the 45th Virginia Infantry Regiment. Heth took command of Hill's division and led it with characteristic aggressiveness through the rest of the battle. on July 3 his division participated in the attack on Cemetery Ridge that came to be known as Pickett's Charge He died of Bright's disease at his home in Washington, D.C., on September 27, 1899 He finished at the bottom of his class along with his cousin
Image of page 4
A.P. Hill
Image of page 5

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 6
  • Fall '12
  • Petit
  • Civil War, Robert E. Lee, American Civil War, Confederate States of America, West Point, Stonewall Jackson

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern