ARCH 314 Fall - 2006 Midterm

ARCH 314 Fall- - .4 M.C 6 a‘o ESQ".~"\rchiteeturc 314'l"lieor-‘ and Criticism Contemporary'l‘rends and Developments Midterm

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Unformatted text preview: .4; M .C. 6) a‘o ESQ" .~"\rchiteeturc 314 'l"lieor}--‘ and Criticism: Contemporary 'l‘rends and Developments Midterm Examination: Wednesday, 8:15-10:00arn (Harris Hall) Room 101 Student Name —_— Student ID No.______ Part I: Identify the author of each passage: (total 36 points) A. Michel Foucault (Discipline and Punish) B. Manfredo Tafiiri (L ’Architecture dans le Boudoir) C. Greg Lynn (On Animate Form) D. Frances Yates (Architecture and the Art of Memory) E. Frederic Jameson (Time and the Concept of Modernity) 1. E “modernity is not a concept, philosophical or otherwise, but rather a narrative category. It cannot be used without implying a before and after, without generating... the supplement of its opposite... namely, the unmodem, the premodern and eventually the postmodern.” 2. g “It raises the rather interesting thought, that a building lives, not only by its actual visible existence, but by its invisible reflection in the memories of generations of men. And this puts me in mind of the thought, that real buildings are the result of invisible plans in minds of architects. .. The design of the building is prior to its execution in material stuff.” ‘2 Xi‘Today, he who is willing to make architecture speak is forced to rely on materials empty of any and all meaning... We will therefore examine 1) those trends which respond to language as a purely technical neutrality, which set themselves against the destruction of language as it is generated by a bureaucratized architecture. . a mechanism of power reduced to its ideal form; its fimctioning, abstracted from any obstacle, resistance or fiiction, must be represented as a pure architectural and optical system: it is in fact a figure of political technology that may an must be detached from any specific use.” 4. k “The Panopticon must not be understood as a dream building: it is the diagram of ( E) “Concurrent with the Amsterdam housing project, we designed a coffee and tea 5 t for Alessi. .. We drew up a family of curves that were compatible when surfaced together, put those into a spreadsheet program, and generated fifty thousand variations of the cofiee pot. We found a way to manufacture them by heating aerospace-grade titanium to nine hundred degrees until it became sofi, using an oven depressurized to have the same atmosphere as Outer space. The titanium is then inflated into a CNC machined carbon mold by igniting argon gas between two welded sheets... So for a $1,000 premium you can create mass-produced art, allowing everybody to have a one-of-a-kind object.” “(a Please select and mark the best answer or answers for each of the following questions. 6. In architecture, as in language, the effect of denying a fix meaning adds a richness of possible connotations by intermittently hiding and unveiling its content. In this manner the authority of Language is brokeni the traditional role of knowledge is destabilized, the notion of a fixed author is undermined and the foundations of reason are overturned while language continues without fixed propositions. Derrida achieves this task of deconstruction, by assigning meaning, not to the fixed relationship between the word and its meaning, but through a visual system of: D a. avant-garde spectacle D b. technoscicnce D c. anti-humanism and post-humanism m d. indexical difference and differance D e. none of the above 7. In his designs for the Parc de la Villette, Paris (1984) Bernard Tschumi reinterprets the goals of a “deconstructivist architecture” by using: D a. mapping a series of landscape Parte, grids and superimpositions D b. constructing disjunctive spatial narratives and landscape topographies D c. utilizing abstract or indeterminate architectural figures that arise from arbitrary arrangements D d. punctuating the landscape with garden follies whose disturbing structural arrangement parody Constructivist architecture w c. all of the above 8. In the most simple of terms, Post-humanist practices in architecture replace the human artistic agent with other material agents, design machines or self-serving logics of production They undermine the value of the human producer. “The important question is whether individuals are granted some measure of autonomy, or, alternatively, are represented as subjects of these structural logics.” According to Michael Hays the use of anti-humanist and post-humanist design practices are already evident in the work of: D a. the Leonidov brothers D b. Mics van der Rohe and Ludwig Hilberseimer ac. Peter Eisenman and Bernhard Tschumi Cl d. Frank Gehry D c. all of the above 9 n his book The Open, Girogio Agamben, rephrases the question of post-humanisms, by asking: If we were never human agents, might we have always been productive animals? Seeing architecture from this point of View, “with non-human eyes,” might reveal still more fundamental structural logics in architecture. Agamben’s notion of “Animalities” or “Anthropogenesis,” underlies our contemporary theories of: m a. formal abstraction and avant-garde play D b. diagrammatic architectures D c. mapping information flows Jar/d. architectural space and environmental studies D 6. me of the above 0. The historical avant-garde exaggerated modern synthetic elements in unexpected ways, transformed them into the cornerstones of a revolutionary ethos using a radical polemic and a widespread use of subversive or disruptive artistic techniques. Although engaged in an all-encompassing nihilism, they ultimately succeeded in “elevating these autonomous artistic practices back into the praxis of everyday life.” In contrast, the contemporary repetition of these avant-garde practices merely serves to: Na. reinforce the conventions of our artistic institutions D b. undermine consumer logics D c. distort abstract design methods D d. disrupt the conventionality of architecture m. none of the above 11. Contemporary projects, such as Rem Koolhaas’ The Prada Store, New York City (2002) deliberately creating heightened commodity spaces by: D a. orchestrating grand spectacles for completing the visual act of consumption D b. activating constantly changing mobile displays with contrasting materials intended to extend the mystique of the brand D c. utilizing digital display screens to display alluring images only for distraction or their and shock value D d. arranging open theatrical spaces solely for the purpose of seeing and being seen. me. all ofthe above . In the Society of the Spectacle, Guy Debord gives us a precise date in which the “visual spectacle" began -- 1927. Which of the following reasons were given by Jonathan Crary for choosing this panicular date? D a. state governments and media corporations divided and regulated the broadcast spectrum H b. the first broadcast television transmission was perfected D c. James McKeen conducted the first psychological studies of human visual attention at Columbia University E d. The Jazz Singer was released, the first sound] image film K all of the above Part ll: Essay Questions (total 64 points) /g Choose two of the following questions and compose a brief essay response in a familiar writing style. 1. (The Devolution of the Sign) Modern architecture tried to preserve the value of the s_ign, to recognize the building arts as having l39_t_l_1__a programmatic material agenda and a rational discursive role (a social communicative fiinction). This argument was essential to our critical understanding of history and theory. Contemporary design practices, on the other hand, challenge the sign. 1.) Using architectural examples fioniygur readin s, or emplesfami iar to you, trace the demise of the architectural si n fiom flgdermsm to the Po — em, from 53m Deconstructivist architectures to the role of the Sp'eiaacle, and fi'om the Commodity Sign to the “coded practices” of contemporary productivities. 2.) Speculate as to the importance of this change, its actual effect on our understanding and, whether the sign (and architectural representation in general) can be avoided. i. Madlern archiR-CC'K'W‘C Jrr'x‘cd- to 9m5croc We came cE— 4cm— €qu \93 a\\ou5\w’) ‘Lk f; be More. ‘me Just» an or cementan to be Consumed. "is has a {moi-ion Cwuk ('6m50h.1} was in I ‘Meovm 00, Modernism was om Oc'rWPir out “91¢th \J \W\ MOWWNN 4’me woukti bell-CF W 02 on - ‘ MWKW\&-TD&N1 ,uxit’dn COVIRM€°(‘}"7 destfin (practices, 56m: «3an 15 bimrj mandala—ax VHW WWW Ldnoiofitcs DUNK We \MMoon QM W1 spectacle. .- | Kn CobeSiCX wa- (SM'V awe“ng ltn S‘kelvfl e. Uses Qanaato's gwmsrkes and. QW‘DO‘hOt‘S m conJoncheCdm {t VJ-UAA own '\&M\SJWP\OJ\’TM\oO\I\ w\1\d.m jg ' WM W‘IW Mfififianj. Tvfig ‘5 fine SW‘“ Kym“ *he' ckecmne 0‘? Moderm'sm (“me *0 make em otrdm \f‘ 'ch *Puresy“ germ. _ ' ' F GA ob ec't. (eggs -.Mocterm5m I where. “We. SWpA WOS no toners at!" 5r is We soNEHA'mg 4;? be: (Mdtond c .m hm Tr “'0 Mt lb . . “RA. has J‘M Age, baseline» j\otr-ielrxHamill/‘2, has 5N ~ \oecomL @- gmawo’r, an& an we»! a? “re. The \0U\\&.\V\0‘) l-K-SfiKi’ was 0. coMMW‘r curs Pog—k-MOoLarvusm becqu I1: is a .6ch . 1* knots m GAOLXKH “into mass pméwuz, (OWQomr‘ 6008.5 which cam be lomrxdladl aims. So\&- 4N5. W 310‘“ “1+ III! M Part II: Essay Questions 2. (Contemporary Productivities) The co emporary demise of history and criticism was paralleled by the emergence of new archi ralforms of productivity, of a renewed aesthetic appreciation and the 1 design machines intended for a “neo-liberal” society. Ifwe abandon ' tory and adopt the individualized role of technology, the naturalized vision of techn 'ence or the speculative fields of post-humanism and animalities, we achieve an unp eled level of serial production. 1.) Again, using precise examples from your readings, pies familiar to you, identify the unique systems of production inherent to media cultures, diagram architectures (of certainty or undecidabiliiy) anti-humanist and post-humanist p ' . 2,) Speculate as to how these strategies of production change the definition of design, the role of the artistic agent and the importance of the architecmml consumer. Parl II: Essay Questions _, 3. (Defending a Contemporary Avant-garde) In contemporary design practices, we intentionally lose architectural memory (the significance of the individual monument) and we reject the modern linear narrative for pow-temporalities or the cult of synchronicity (the constant desire to be in—sync with the present). This might be a method of overcoming the orthodoxy of the past, or a means to explore repressed or latent questions in contemporary design. 1.) Within this context of repetition, and eternal return, how would you define the role of a contemporary avant— garde. 2.) Using only familiar examples, explain how this avant-garde architecture might escape its own redundancy to serve some ethical social purpose. Archifiecm usedz to lot odor:us manor-j Omar Monomw‘r. in we beasmn‘mg ankisettum gcruca as a five 0"” Media in rowan {n-ForMaL-‘élovx woutci vesicle. “500 “Mug. JKS‘H— fie-{.91 boxkdiflo); Cw‘é, KW“ abokfi' MN; Bbe o-( omr Mics ivx \rushomj _ New log; We “we “my “50 we We wen-won «Manama; w ern'K-vne} prays 9M \u‘H—r 46M— mi‘erm‘i’ amdkfimdlsiolq, PTd/{tht’wvc \AeLS CJo\Ut& WWUC‘M mod-armsmipossr,Mo&misml a—€C°“‘3*WCEWCSW,O~MOVU) cm to awake. ox mw architectw‘e, TN. conktMpomvy manhofimi. TecWAdocw is one of m . ‘_'-'-‘—F'-: - CJ'LHLr/A gm; m MAX; Wsewvfi, as t& \5 always euolvmf. we cam no low?!” sttr toe ‘m-sjac u)\"d/\ M (arts-cunt of how-‘1 fies V3 M (305*- Teckndxoow 'ig qlKouSmj us to become. Moul‘bfitchhwe’mli- pm& sle/“62)- Pkaaoo& 67¢ka a? wzs Noemi )0?— ?mnk— Gcm‘f's noch mcludma Ed; MM%%,'M 04nd 'Jd/VL brews Cancer”? ml).TV~mua\h JAM. (206%an o? \A‘xs Wanna sthome, he Ls mom to speak at mm osmivefl'w‘i uéxnfi Forms WM’ Lax/UK, WWW mamH/«Lafi be (“\Lo’mA—cdl. UURW lcaclrww’toc‘v] 'deridlhc‘] Lonkvhfmmj m‘fin’m owe odd-e. 40:3 Aways QEQW. This chews US to cit—ch1 {its oven «dun&ouf‘t7fiasfié. 6-Wi‘n‘] 'L-k W 099“de +9 58ch CL (Sr-miter PUrPos—e. "1* can bLCorwa, Wm 'kvxmfl 303k Ck. budddnfi. 0\ little Short- "immut- r L500 Mmfiv“) pwm‘l’S WW Comm (In wmol p.114 Bauolnflml Study Guide for Preceptorial ARCH 314 WHIP, idler/1 WM - nw’ W‘l — tough/‘3 Inscribing the Subject of Modernism - Mies van der Rohe’s 1922 skyscraper and the new compositional methods - Crisis of humanism and critical mediation . - Beaudrillard signs and meanings ' Q‘VW" ‘“‘*e5 mm“ +0 M ("3” - Artistic creation - Hilberseimer’s definition of Dadaism Posthuman Agency - actor-network theory definition(technoscience) - how signs are understood by posthumanist and poststructuralist - the important question of posthumanism — what form posthumanism takes Idea of the Avant—garde — the beginning/history of avant~garde - elitism vs. antielitism - Fourierism - Nonconformity of avant-garde - Calinescu’s style of avant-garde - Conditions of avant-garde; and the death of avant—garde Colomina — Talk about the American avant—garde of housing prototypes in museums Spectacle, Attention, Counter-Memory - understand the year Debord chose as the year of the spectacle, an why he chose - that year 1127- cmbm at {twistw .pnmm‘. of jewel-3w“ Music sham Mpfibvl Pldvvfi - Debord’s two types of spectacles Concurlvn’ced ' #5554 " of! “WW9 “flu? _ U5“ "(up-huhka ,olu'wcrhcj L’espirit Nouveau L“ h“ (’9 mhd§ - how mass-production effects sociear and architecture - bidet as art or object ' Damwfrs W‘hifl- MM H17 “ e fiwwlig - Corbu’s ideas on what a museum should be— mifiurgfi - How Corbu distances himself from avant-garde - Understand Corbu’s ribbon—window’ W"? Wd' 6’“ f‘cfi‘t/ “55°” RH: View? Baudrillard, System of Objects & Consumerism - the change in advertisi and why - ® traditional morality vs. dvertising philosophy 0 (bi/‘6’“ b 1"“ ‘7qu - understand positives and negatives of universal code ® 6-) discs W5" dewt Q over siwupufied Foucault, Disciple, etc. - understand the panopticon and how it works - th d ali of 3110 ticons and how its 3 stern works 6 11 W p p “m? D- S‘IXPV “A Pope( 4w,“ booLJ‘, ?~0¢'\|th+ W; m (fit-2e! {are 6.15ng ‘a’flll wwkeS ,- (WWWMY - baqzm (M volt/We i Submcm Mathematics of Ideal Villa 05 056 A Mums J - what is beauty knml-o‘emfiy , P‘OWMM- /Q.M\9i\§—l:e$ 3M0- walowg - roofs on the two prototypes Boa-ac Guam“ 05. 9| 17—“ ~ freedoms of plans of both Palladio and Corbusier Immhmimlple mm 6 Example test questions from preceptorial: 1. Through the housing prototypes placed in museum gardens, how does the avant~ garde reach Americans and respond to a post-war society? 2. Who’s definition of Dadaism was as follows: it fulfilled the constestatory obligation of art to resist the security of habit and explode the nostalgia for a reconciliation between subject and object no longer possible, while remaining a ‘primitive’ will to form. A. Hilberseimer B. Dada C. Derrida D. Le Corbusier \ (been wok houses in W Coo/i'j‘x-FILS 0F museum; .. WS‘: Wd'ucfion ...
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This test prep was uploaded on 02/20/2008 for the course ARCH 314 taught by Professor Wolf during the Fall '06 term at USC.

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ARCH 314 Fall- - .4 M.C 6 a‘o ESQ".~"\rchiteeturc 314'l"lieor-‘ and Criticism Contemporary'l‘rends and Developments Midterm

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