Commonplace book - Common Place Book Midterm Zephan...

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Common Place Book Midterm Zephan Blaxberg February 29, 2008
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Week Two: (Jan. 14-18) 17th and Early 18th Century England Algernon Sidney, “Apology” and selections from “Discourses concerning Government,” CAPCT, Vol. I, pp. 35-40: This passage discusses a man who is on trial for something and he basically apologizes. 1. “This being laid aside, the whole matter is reduced to the papers said to be found in my closet by the king’s officers, without an other proof of their being written by me…” These papers in which he speaks of 2. “appear to relate unto a large treatise written long since in answer to Filmer’s book, which, by all intelligent men, is thought to be grounded upon wicked principles, equally pernicious unto magistrates and people.” In “Discourses concerning Government,” there is a common idea discussed of democracy versus tyranny. 3. “Governments are not set up for the advantage, profit, pleasure or glory of one or a few men, but for the good of society.” They continue to explain, 4. “For this reason Plato and Aristotle find no more certain way of distinguishing between a lawful king and a tyrant, than that the first seeks to procure the common good, and the other his own pleasure of profit.” The author concludes, 5. “Few kings or tyrants…go down to the grave in peace.” The best kind of ruler 6. “required that the wisest, best, and most valiant men, should be placed in the offices where wisdom, virtue and valour are requisite.” John Locke, selections from “Second Treatise on Government,” in CAPCT, Vol. I, pp. 50-71: John Locke tries to argue that people have a social contract to behave and cooperate with the government. Along with many other authors of famous documents, Locke includes a reference to Sir Robert Filmer. He makes an important point when discussing slavery in saying, 7. “for no body can desire to have me in his absolute power unless it be to compel me by force to that which is against the right of my freedom, i.e. make me a slave.” He explains that anyone, 8. “who makes an attempt to enslave me, thereby puts himself into a state of war with me. He that, in the state of nature, would take away the freedom that belongs to any one in that state, must necessarily be supposed to have a design to take away every thing else.” Joseph Addison, “Letter against parties,” in CAPCT, Vol. I, pp. 78-79: Joseph Addison talks about malice between different parties; he shares a story though with a powerful meaning: 9. “This worthy Knight being then but a Strippling, had occasion to enquire which was the way to St. Anne’s Lane…the person whom he spoke to, instead of answering his question, called him a young popish cur, and asked him who had made Anne a Saint?” The next person he went up to he asked the same question but left out the word saint and got this response he, 10. “ was called a Prick-eared Cur for his pains, and instead of being shewn the way, was told, that she had been a saint before he
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was born.” His lesson was that whenever he would go into a neighborhood, he would ask
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This note was uploaded on 05/11/2008 for the course GHIST 225 taught by Professor H.gelfand during the Spring '08 term at James Madison University.

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Commonplace book - Common Place Book Midterm Zephan...

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