Technical Abstract 7

Technical Abstract 7 - Experiment #7-9 Biomaterials For...

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Experiment #7-9 Biomaterials For Remediation of the Texas Environment Chemistry 112-565 Mina Baratifar , Katie Foster, and Vikrahm Purohit (T.A.) Spring 2008 Abstract: The common herbicide atrazine is moderately toxic to humans and other animals. Alarmingly, high concentrations of atrazine are commonly found in supplies of drinking water. In an effort to remedy this situation, many different experiments have been conducted to determine the most effective method of atrazine removal. The Chemistry 112 students utilized an analog of atrazine, Procion Red, to test the sequestering abilities of four different filtration mediums: F300 charcoal, F400 charcoal, unmodified cotton balls, and modified cotton balls. Throughout the experiment, serial dilution sand spectrophotometry instruments were used in tandem with different techniques for setting up filtration systems were used to determine the best filtration method depending on which system removed the greatest amount of atrazine from the water. It was determined that F300 charcoal would be considered the best method in removing the atrazine from contaminated
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waters. This was determined by finding the experiment which yielded the highest percent transmittance and the lowest absorbance value. Introduction: Prior to the widespread use of herbicides, cultural controls, such as altering the soil pH, salinity, or fertility levels were used to control weeds. However, as the virulence of weeds began to encroach on scarce resources, agricultural output was adversely affected, and thus a new herbicide known as atrazine was introduced. Most herbicides effect metabolic pathways associated with only plants, which have no effect on humans, birds, amphibians and reptiles. Other herbicides, however, can cause serious damage which range from a harmless skin rash to death. According to Extension Toxicology Network, "The oral LD 50 for atrazine is 3090 mg/ kg in rats, 1750 mg/kg in mice, 750 mg/kg in rabbits, and 1000 mg/kg in hamsters. The dermal LD 50 in rabbits is 7500 mg/kg and greater than 3000 mg/kg in rats. The 1-hour inhalation LC 50 is greater than 0.7 mg/L in rats. The 4-hour inhalation LC 50
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is 5.2 mg/L in rats." In essence, atrazine is moderately toxic in humans and other animals. Some countries have gone so far as to ban the herbicide from use. Alarmingly high concentrations of atrazine are commonly found in supplies of drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency states that atrazine levels should be kept at a constant 3 ppb, although it is common knowledge that atrazine levels can often far exceed this number, especially after its application and spring runoff. It is often a very expensive and time consuming process to remove atrazine from the water supply, and thus research groups and scientists alike are constantly searching for a cheaper and more effective way to go about atrazine removal. Currently, charcoal is being used to remove this substance from groundwater.
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Technical Abstract 7 - Experiment #7-9 Biomaterials For...

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