CMNS 101 Sample Speech (1)

CMNS 101 Sample Speech (1) - SAMPLE INFORMATIVE SPEECH The...

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SAMPLE INFORMATIVE SPEECH The Psychology of Color Would you believe me if I told you that color has an effect on suicide rates? As a matter of fact, overlooking the Thames River in London is a gloomy-looking black bridge known as the Black Friars Bridge, a favorite leaping off point for despondent citizens. Color consultants studying the situation suggested that the city paint the bridge another, more soothing color. The bridge was repainted and immediately the suicide incidences declined in number. Many ancient people believed that color possessed magical powers. In researching the psychology of color I have found that even today we assume there is a link between color and our minds. For example, the optimist we say views the world through “rose colored glasses”. When a person is sad we say they are in a “blue” mood. A jealous person is said to be “green” with envy. And now, scientists are discovering that certain colors do indeed have an influence on our bodies, moods and behaviors. Today I will inform you about three aspects of color that affect all of us. We will look at the concept of color, the effects of color on moods, and finally, the psychological differences between colors. First, what is the concept of color? Alexander Schauss, the director of the American Institute for Biosocial Research tells us that “colors are electromagnetic wave bands of energy. Each color has its own wave length and can be duplicated by combining two other colors or wavelength.” These wave bands stimulate chemicals located in your eyes, sending impulses or messages to the pituitary glands near the brain. These glands regulate hormones and other physiological systems in your body. Stimulated by our response to colors, glandular activities can alter your mood, speed up your heart rate, and increase brain activity. As you can see, the colors that surround us can affect our hormones and the secretions in our bloodstream. Second, these secretions also affect our moods and affect the way we react and respond to other people and the situations in which we find ourselves. In general, we find dark colors heavy and foreboding, while we see light colors as not only cheerful, but physically light as well. Bonnie Bender,
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color marketing manager at Pittsburg Paints, and an authority on color psychology, reports on an experiment that tested the psychological effect of paint on worker productivity. Researchers painted heavy boxes white and light boxes black. When tested, the workmen had considerably more trouble lifting the light, black boxes than the heavy, white ones.
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