ART 130 notes - a powerful reminder and expression of the values and ideals that men and women have cherished for

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1 Democracy is a Greek word meaning, “power of the people,” and was developed in Athens over 2500 years ago, which is around the same time that classical architecture first began. Architecture is art that we live in, and the Greeks developed three different types of orders. Orders, meaning styles, which we still use today. Many of our civic buildings and national monuments, including the United States Supreme Court building incorporate these orders, to reflect what guided our nation’s founders. When democracy first came into wave, it prevented the Greeks from building palaces or big tombs, because politically all men are supposed to be equal, and so it would be unconstitutional for someone to have a big palace even if they could afford it. Greek architecture is all around and is our living heritage, passed down for thousands of years. Whether we find it adorning the facades of our municipal courts, our civic buildings, our outdoor theaters, it remains
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Unformatted text preview: a powerful reminder and expression of the values and ideals that men and women have cherished for millennia. (http://www.usfca.edu/classes/AuthEd/Greek%20Temple/history.htm) Which is of no surprise that we construct our democratic buildings to remind us of our Greek architecture past. The Greek idea was that a society works best if all citizens are equal and free, and to share in the responsibilities in running a state, in other words, in a democracy. The Greeks were the first to realize that democracy could lead to something else besides disaster. With this new day came an explosion of the creative spirit in Greece, producing the architecture, the art, the drama, and the philosophy that have shaped Western civilization ever since. (http://www.artchive.com/artchive/G/greek.html) Works cited: History of the Greek temple http://www.usfca.edu/classes/AuthEd/Greek%20Temple/history.htm Greek art http://www.artchive.com/artchive/G/greek.html...
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This note was uploaded on 05/12/2008 for the course ART 130 taught by Professor Kaye during the Spring '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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