20s and 30s worksheet packet - The Invention of Bad Breath In the 1910s and particularly the 1920s advertisers focused their attention on identifyingand

20s and 30s worksheet packet - The Invention of Bad Breath...

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______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ Observations : Make a list of what you see in this artifact. __________________________ ___________________________ __________________________ ___________________________ Conclusions : Based upon the picture or the reading: 1. How do you think adverts during the 1920s were different than today? 2. What emotions did advertisers of the 1920s want to make people feel? 3. What does always a bridesmaid never a bride mean? 4. How much money in sales did Listerine make in 1927? 5. Do advertisements of today appeal to people caring about how they look? The Invention of Bad Breath In the 1910s and particularly the 1920s, advertisers focused their attention on identifying—and often inventing—personal anxieties that could be resolved by the purchase of specific products. “Advertising,” wrote one commentator in a trade publication, “helps to keep the masses dissatisfied with their mode of life, discontented with ugly things around them. Satisfied customers are not as profitable as discontented ones.” Listerine mouthwash took this approach. The Lambert Pharmacal Company had developed the antibacterial liquid back in the 1880s, and it was long sold as a general antiseptic. After World War I, the company sought to expand its market. Advertising man Gordon Seagrove recalls being called in by the Lambert Brothers to discuss how this could be done. The company’s chief chemist was enlisted to describe the product and its uses. “As he read along in a singsong voice,” Seagrove remembers, “he mentioned halitosis. Everybody said ‘What’s that?’” Learning that it referred to “unpleasant breath,” they immediately thought “maybe that’s the peg we can hang our hat on.” Although there was some worry about whether such a “delicate subject” could be handled in magazines and newspapers, Seagrove and his collaborator, Milton Feasley, launched an ad campaign that played heavily on fears about how others would react to a halitosis sufferer. The most famous of their ads concerned the “pathetic” case of “Edna,” who was “often a bridesmaid but never a bride.” She was approaching the “tragic” thirtieth birthday unmarried because she suffered from halitosis—a disorder that “you, yourself, rarely know when you have it. And even your closest friends won’t tell you.” In response to the ad campaign, Listerine sales went from $100,000 per year in 1921 to more than $4 million in 1927.
________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ Observations : Make a list of what you see in this picture. __________________________ ___________________________ __________________________ ___________________________ Conclusions : Based upon the picture or the reading, answer the following questions: 1. Based upon the reading, what does prohibition mean? 2. How do you think these people felt about prohibition? 3. When did alcohol become illegal in the United States? 4. Do you think that Americans generally followed the prohibition laws? 5. Can you think of a modern day example of prohibition? 6. What did people who were against prohibition argue that prohibition did?

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