philosophynotes2

philosophynotes2 - "It is the case p" vs. "I...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“It is the case  p ” vs. “I believe that  p 18/02/2008 09:01:00 3 – representation of the number three True beliefs vs. false beliefs vs. not known beliefs (truth values) Philosophy = conceptual engineering
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Review: items, Their Names, and Our Thoughts about them 18/02/2008 09:01:00 The tree drawing -  The notion/idea of the tree   A representation of the tree A set of statements/beliefs is logically consistent if and only if it is possible for  all the members of that set to be true. A set of statements/beliefs is logically  inconsistent if and only if it is not logically consistent. o A. Good vegetables are hard to find. The Dodgers are no longer in  Brooklyn. Today is hotter than yesterday. (inc.) o B. Henry likes real ice cream. Real ice cream is a dairy product. There  isn’t a dairy product Harry likes. (inc.) o C. Washington DC is the capital of the United States. Paris is the  capital of France. Ottawa is the capital of Canada. (const.) o D. Washington DC is the capital of the US. Paris is the capital of  France. Toronto is the capital of Canada. (const.) o E. The weather is fine. Tomorrow is Tuesday. Two plus two equals  four. We’re almost out of gas. (const.) Arguments An argument is a set of beliefs/thoughts/statements/designed to provide  evidence i.e. the premises for a claim i.e. the conclusion An argument is deductively valid if and only if it is not possible for the  premises to be true and the conclusion false. An argument is deductively  invalid if and only if it is not deductively valid. o Everybody who pisses off many other people gets killed. Socrates  pissed off many people.
Background image of page 2
Exercises: testing validity of an argument 18/02/2008 09:01:00 A statement can be expressed in  many different sentences.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mind-Body Dualisms 18/02/2008 09:01:00 1. The Mind-Body problem Physical characteristics o Having size, weight, shapes o Taking up space Mental properties o Being in pain o Being happy Monism – one idea 2. Forms of Dualism Interactionism: we form intentions that cause our bodies to move. Epiphenomenalism; The body can affect the mind, but the mind cannot affect  the body. Parallelism; There is no casual interaction between the mind and the body,  they are like parallel trains running down parallel tracks. Occasionalism; God uses the existence of things as the occasion for putting 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 11

philosophynotes2 - "It is the case p" vs. "I...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online