CTCS_200_Q3

CTCS_200_Q3 - 3. After WWI the perception of the Hollywood...

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3. After WWI the perception of the Hollywood studio system began to lose credibility as an artistic medium. Filmmakers and critics, particularly French, saw Hollywood as a low brow factory used to pump out films to maximize profit. As a result, some directors claimed a heavier responsibility to give a film a unique visual style, which would reveal its creativity and social relevance. These directors, or autuers were regarded as the creative force behind films. Howard Hawks was one of the most lauded and successful auteurs from this era. Hawks was consistent in his worldview, usually portraying an exhilaration that came from a small adventurous team of insiders working in pursuit of a goal that defied the dreary grind of an American Dream and his visual style included seamless editing utilizing an invisible shot and reverse shot technique. Often times even the women are also given masculine tendancies. However critics such as Robin Wood recognized that his style was largely characterized by a lack or responsibility from the central characters and the films themes. Wood describes the gangsters in Scarface as ignorant children and goes further to describe the film as propaganda for irresponsible behavior. Hawks evades the social effects of gangsters by simply eliminating society. Hence in Scarface the ostensible
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CTCS_200_Q3 - 3. After WWI the perception of the Hollywood...

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