in-freedom-ex-felon-becomes-probation-counselor week 4.htm

in-freedom-ex-felon-becomes-probation-counselor week 4.htm...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Skip to Main Content   Search   Toggle search  Stations Donate Shop Sign In/Register  Logout News Arts & Life Music Topics  News U.S. World Politics Business Technology Science Health Race & Culture Education Arts & Life Books Movies Pop Culture Food Art & Design Performing Arts Photography Music First Listen Songs We Love Music Articles Tiny Desk Concerts Videos Programs  News and Conversations
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Morning Edition All Things Considered Fresh Air Here & Now The Diane Rehm Show Latino USA On The Media On Point Weekend Edition Saturday Weekend Edition Sunday Storytelling & Humor Ask Me Another The Best Of Car Talk Bullseye Invisibilia Radiolab Snap Judgment StoryCorps TED Radio Hour Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! Music All Songs Considered Alt.Latino First Listen From The Top Jazz Night In America Metropolis Microphone Check Mountain Stage Piano Jazz Song Travels The Thistle & Shamrock World Cafe Listen News  > U.S. In Freedom, Ex-Felon Becomes Probation Counselor DECEMBER 11, 2012 3:24 PM ET
Image of page 2
from Julie Bierach  Listen to the Story All Things Considered 4 min 50 sec Playlist Download Transcript Clark Porter was 17 when he was sentenced to 35 years in prison for robbing a downtown post office at gunpoint. He spent 15 years in prison and today helps some of the toughest ex- offenders turn their lives around. Courtesy of Washington Universtiy in St. Louis hide caption itoggle caption Courtesy of Washington Universtiy in St. Louis Every weekday, Clark Porter, a tall man with a sturdy build, walks into the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse in St. Louis to work with tough ex-offenders. On the outside, he wears a suit and tie. But on the inside, he has more in common with the former felons than most. Back in 1986, a skinny 17-year-old Porter went on trial there as an adult for robbing a post office at gunpoint. His sentence: 35 years. "The hardest part of prison is when you get into year five," he says. "That's when you start hearing the door close. You get these pangs of reality, and it's like, 'Wow, I've got a 35-year- sentence; I'm not going anywhere." Porter served 15 years. When released in 2001, he radically changed his life and enrolled at
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern