06Physical_Design_new - Physical Design Chapter 6 Douglas...

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Physical Design Chapter 6 Douglas Shook
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Shook – Spring 2005 Physical Design Mapping the logical database structures developed in previous stages to physical data structures Key here is performance
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Shook – Spring 2005 Physical Design Last Stage of the design process Records, indexes & other data structures to provide: - adequate performance - integrity - security - recoverability
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Shook – Spring 2005 Physical Design Must know/use: User processing requirements identified in the requirements definition stage Characteristics of the DBMS (strengths and weaknesses Characteristics of the OS and Hardware (disk speed, data transfer rate, CPU, etc.) Network considerations (if appropriate)
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Shook – Spring 2005 Physical Design Key Components: Data Volume and Usage Data Distribution File Organization Indexes Integrity Constraints
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Shook – Spring 2005 Data Volume Estimate how much data will be stored ( can be tough to do ) Volume = # of records in each relation When do we archive data?
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Shook – Spring 2005 LOCATION TREATMENT PATIENT PHYSICIAN CHARGE ITEM 4000 50 500 10,000 1000 100 (4) (20) (10) (20) (10) Figure 6-2 Logical data model with volumes and ratios (Mountain View Community Hospital)
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Shook – Spring 2005 Usage Analysis Estimate how often data will be used ( can be tough to do ) Usage = transactions and processes accessing the data Combine the process vs. entity matrix with the simplified user view
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Shook – Spring 2005 PATIENT CHARGE ITEM 1 2 3 TRANSACTION ANALYSIS FORM TRANSACTION NO. ____________________ DATE ____________ TRANSACTION NAME _____________________________________ TRANSACTION VOLUME: AVERAGE____________________________ PEAK ____________ TRANSACTION MAP: MVCH-4 4/12/9X CREATE PATIENT BILL 2 / HR. 10/ HR. NO. NAME TYPE OF ACCESS NO. OF REFERENCES PER TRAN. PER PERIOD 1 ENTRY-PATIENT R 1 10 2 PATIENT-CHARGE R 10 100 3 CHARGE-ITEM R 10 100 TOTAL REFERENCES 21 210 Figure 6-3 Analysis of the transaction CREATE PATIENT BILL (Mountain View Hospital)
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Shook – Spring 2005 Composite Usage Map Combine all the transaction maps (based upon user views) and then overlay them on the data volume analysis Not always done formally for smaller jobs, but the basic numbers should be worked out Must then know required response time - TPS vs. MIS varies greatly Tells us where to focus out physical design efforts - indexing - Data locations - Etc.
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Shook – Spring 2005 LOCATION TREATMENT PATIENT PHYSICIAN CHARGE ITEM 100 4000 1000 50 10,000 500 (75) (20) (200) (50) (100) (50) (30) (25) (50) (25) (50) (50) Figure 6-4 Composite usage map (Mountain View Community Hospital)
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Shook – Spring 2005 Designing Fields Data Type - Fixed vs. Variable - Number vs. Character - Raw - Long and Long Raw Code Look-up Table - Compress values - Restrict value range Data Integrity - Default - Range - Null value - Referential
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Shook – Spring 2005 File Organization
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