PSYC 333 CHAPTER 11 - Chapter 11: Sexual/Affectional...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

The preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.
Chapter 11: Sexual/Affectional Orientations and DiversitySexual/Affectional Orientations and IdentitiesSexual VS Affectional Orientations-‘Sexual orientation’: Traditionally refers to individual’s tendency to beattracted to men and/or women-Affectional orientation:Interaction between affect and cognition suchthat it produces attraction, erotic desire, and ultimately feelings of love formembers of the other sex, the same sex, or bothoBetter terminology than ‘sexual orientation’-Bisexual and same-sex orientations weren’t recognized previouslyoPeople assumed to have heterosexual attractionoHomosexuals believed to be treacherous, immoral, corruptAttempts to Measure Sexual/Affectional Orientation-Use of scalesoKinsey scale: Operational definitions of sexual orientations thatrange from exclusively heterosexual to exclusively homosexualPlacement on scale is self-reported (0-heterosexual, 10-homosexual)oKlein Sexual Orientation Grid:7 components: Sexual attraction, sexual behaviour, sexualfantasies, emotional preference, social preference, self-identification, heterosexual/homosexual lifestyleMore detailed and inclusive as it allows respondents toindicate past, present, ideal preferencesoSexuality QuestionnaireMore detailed and inclusiveMeasure affectional orientation on two separate scales-interest in males and females6 components: Sexual attraction, sexual fantasies, sexualpreference, propensity to fall in love romantically, being inlove romantically, extent to which one has male and/orfemale sexual partnersIdentity Labels-Sexual identity labels are socially constructedoGay identityoLesbian identityoBisexual identity-Labels are adopted as it signifies a personal significance to the individual-Sexual identity that people give themselves may change over the course oftheir livesoE.g. Bisexuals have identified as gay/lesbian before etc-People may sometimes assume a label that may not be most sociallyacceptable or may not even be accurate in reflecting their affectionalorientation
-Others may assume labels that are socially acceptable even if they don’tidentify with it-Most men reported a same-sex sexual experience at some point in theirlives but did not self-identify as gay (Men who have sex with men)-22% of men, and 13% of women reported having same-sex behaviour, butno sexual desire for members of the same-sex-Queer identity:Identity status intended to not label one’s sexualityoPeople who try to avoid labels identify w this (ironic)-These labels should be seen as adjectives rather than nounsAsexuality-Approximately 1% of individuals in the sample indicated that they wereasexual-Low levels of sexual attraction-Lack of interest in sexual behaviour-Lack of sexual orientation-Lack of sexual excitation-

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 6 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
CarolineF.Pukall
Tags
Homosexuality, Bisexuality, Affectional orientation

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture