book recommend - other aspects of psychology often rattle...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton Malkiel is a solid and wide-ranging survey of finance that's as good a place to start as any (even though it's somewhat skeptical about the value of fundamental analysis) Jeremy Siegel's Stocks for the Long Run, though often criticized as a product of the bull market, is also a good general overview of stocks as an asset class. Why Smart People Make Dumb Money Mistakes by Gary Belsky and Thomas Gilovich is the best entry-level book I've found on the fascinating topic of behavioral finance. People are wired in odd ways that cause us to make decisions that are out of whack with what we rationally "should" do. If you don't know what those flaws are, you can't try to consciously avoid them while investing. Another excellent book on behavioral finance is Beyond Greed and Fear: Finance and the Psychology of Investing, by Hersh Shefrin. This book shows how bias, perception, and
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: other aspects of psychology often rattle investors and move stocks. Peter Lynch's Beating the Street is essentially the journal of a very successful money manager, which is what makes it so readable and informative. The thing I love about this book is the passion for investing that jumps off every page--if this book doesn't get you excited about picking stocks, nothing will. Marty Whitman's The Aggressive Conservative Investor, and David Dreman's Contrarian Investment Strategies. Roger Lowenstein's When Genius Failed, which chronicles the rise and fall of the Long-Term Capital Management hedge fund in the late 1990s. I can't recommend this one highly enough. The story is good--LTCM really did come close to causing major financial havoc--and the lessons you can learn are even better....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 05/10/2008 for the course FIN 367 taught by Professor Han during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online