Lec2 - Lecture 2: Arrays, Vectors, & Pointers PIC 10B...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Lecture 2: PIC 10B Todd Wittman Ch. 9 : Arrays b An array is a list of the same data type. The size of an array is fixed. Declare an array with [ ] after the variable name. const int size = 10; //Must be const! string droids[size]; b We access an individual element of array a with a[i]. Remember arrays start at position 0. for (int i=0; i < size; i++) droids[i] = "R2D2"; b We can create 2D arrays to store data in rows and columns. int randoms[10][5]; //10 rows x 5 columns for (int i=0; i < 10; i++) for (int j=0; j < 5; j++) randoms[i][j] = 1+rand()%100; b What does the code above do?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Arrays in Functions b In the function parameters, denote a parameter as an array with blank brackets [ ]. b Generally have to pass the size of the array as a parameter also. void printArray (string names[ ], int size) { for (int i=0; i < size; i++) cout << names[i] << "\n"; return; } b The call to a function just passes the array name. string heroes[4] = {"Luke", "Leia", "Han", "Chewbacca"}; printArray (heroes,4); b Arrays are always passed by reference, so don't bother with an &. This is done to save memory by preventing local copies of the array variables. 2D Arrays b To pass a 2D array, need to specify the dimensions. Best to declare dimensions as global constants. const int table_rows = 20; const int table_cols = 40; void printTable (double table [table_rows] [table_cols]) { for (int i = 0; i < table_rows; i++) { for (int j=0; j < table_cols; j++) { cout << setw(10) << table [i] [j]; } cout << "\n"; } return; } Call this function in main (or wherever) with: printTable (table);
Background image of page 2
3 Ch. 9 : Vectors b Arrays are limited because they can't change size. b Unless you want a 2D array, I would suggest using a vector . It's more flexible and has some nice member functions. b To use vectors, need library: #include <vector> b The basic form of a vector declaration is: vector<data_type> variable_name (size); b For example: vector<string> heroes(4); //Not [] b We can still access the element in position i of vector v with v[i].
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

Lec2 - Lecture 2: Arrays, Vectors, &amp; Pointers PIC 10B...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online