hugoetnoxfactaest (1) - Victor Hugos Et nox facta est(And...

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Victor Hugo’s Et nox facta est (And There Was Night) part of the unfinished epic poem: The End of Satan1 I He1had been falling in the abyss some four thousand years. Never had he yet managed to grasp a peak, Nor lift even once his towering forehead. He sank deeper in the dark and the mist, aghast, Alone, and behind him, in the eternal nights, His wing feathers fell more slowly still. He fell dumbfounded, grim, and silent, Sad, his mouth open and his feet towards the heavens, The horror of the chasm imprinted on his livid face. He cried: “Death!” his fists stretched out in the empty dark.Later this word was man and was named Cain.2He was falling. A rock struck his hand quite suddenly; He held on to it, as a dead man holds on to his tomb, And stopped. Someone, from on high, cried out to him: “Fall!The suns will go out around you, accursed!”And the voice was lost in the immensity of horror. And pale, he looked toward the eternal dawn. The suns were far off, but shone still. Satan raised his head and spoke, his arms in the air: “You lie!” This word was later the soul of Judas.3Like the gods of bronze erect upon their pilasters, He waited a thousand years, eyes fixed upon the stars. The suns were far off, but were still shining. The thunder then rumbled in the skies unhearing, cold. Satan laughed, and spat towards the thunder. Filled by the visionary shadow, the immensity Shivered. This spitting out was later Barabbas.4A passing breath made him fall lower still. II The fall of the damned one began once again.Terrible, Somber, and pierced with holes luminous as a sieve, The sky full of suns withdrew, brightness Trembled, and in the night the great fallen one, Naked, sinister, and pulled by the weight of his crime, Fell, and his head wedging the abyss apart. Lower! Lower, and still lower! Everything presently Fled from him; no obstacle to seize in passing, No mountain, no crumbling rock, no stone, Nothing, shadow! And from fright he closed his eyes. And when they opened, three suns only Shone, and shadow had eaten away the firmament.
Victor Hugo’s Et nox facta est (And There Was Night) part of the unfinished epic poem: The End of Satan2 All the other suns had perished. III A rock Emerged from blackest mist like some arm approaching. He grasped it, and his feet touched summits. Then the dreadful being called Never Dreamed. His forehead sank between his guilty hands. The three suns, far off, like three great eyes, Watched him, and he watched them not. Space resembled our earthly plains, At evening, when the horizon sinking, retreating, Blackens under the white eyes of the ghostly twilight. Long rays entwined the feet of the great exile. Behind him his shadow filled the infinite. The peaks of chaos mingled in themselves. In an instant he felt some horrendous growth of wings; He felt himself become a monster, and that the angel in him Was dying, and the rebel then knew regret.

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