Viruses2008 - Viruses/Worms Cyberinfections The Computer...

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Viruses/Worms
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Cyberinfections The Computer Security Institute (CSI) today released its 2007 report with news that the average annual loss reported by U.S. companies in the 2007 CSI Computer Crime and Security Survey more than doubled, from $168,000 in last year's report to $350,424 in this year's survey. Financial fraud overtook virus attacks as the source of the greatest financial loss. Virus losses, which had been the leading cause of loss for seven straight years, fell to second place. Another significant cause of loss was system penetration by outsiders.
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Viruses Insider abuse of net access Laptop theft
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Viruses List of computer viruses (A-D) List of computer viruses (E-K) List of computer viruses (L-R) List of computer viruses (S-Z) Timeline
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5 dominant viruses 0 20 40 60 80 100 Jan, 2004 Mar May Jul Sept Nov Jan, 2005 Jan, 2006 % reported to Sophos In 2004, according to Sophos, “Netsky-P represented 22.6 percent of all virus incidents and Sasser, a fast-spreading virus that debuted in April, accounted for 14 percent of virus reports and ranked third on the list”
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EARLY HISTORY (Xerox) In the early 1980s, Shock and Hepps conducted experiments with worm-like programs to perform computations on idle hosts on an early Ethernet LAN. The worm programs they were using would, occasionally, get out of control and have to be killed, which proved harder than expected, due to the worms’ ability to hop from host to host. (John Shock, Jon Hepps, The ‘Worm’ Programs – Early Experience with a Distributed Computation, Communications of the ACM , Volume 25, 1982, pp 172‑180. ) In November 1988, the now famous RTM Internet worm was released. There was a bug in that worm…
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WORMS… ( Ian WhalleyBill Arnold, David Chess, John Morar, Alla Segal, Morton Swimmer IBM TJ Watson Research Center, PO Box 704, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598) are a type of “malware” more difficult to define than one might have thought. Here is a brief list of previously suggested definitions: [A worm is] a program that distributes multiple copies of itself within a system or across a distributed system. Programs which are able to replicate themselves (usually across computer networks) as stand-alone programs (or sets of programs) and which do not depend on the existence of a host program are called computer worms. A worm is an independent program which, when run on a computer, will attempt to infect other computer systems. In this case the host program is the operating system of the computer , and the infected code is a stand-alone process or thread of execution running under the operating system.
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WORMS (II) (Fred Cohen, A Formal Definition of Computer Worms and Some Related Results, IFIP-TC11 Computers and Security V11#7, November 1992, pp 641‑652. ) There is currently no generally-accepted set of criteria for determining whether or not a given self-reproducing program is most properly called a "virus" or a "worm. While there is general agreement that
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This note was uploaded on 05/12/2008 for the course EPP 19601 taught by Professor Morel during the Spring '08 term at Carnegie Mellon.

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Viruses2008 - Viruses/Worms Cyberinfections The Computer...

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