Wireless2008 - Wireless Prolegomenon Wi-Fi In 1999 the IEEE...

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Prolegomenon Wi-Fi In 1999 the IEEE completed and approved the standard  known as  802.11b , and WLANs were born. ( 802 ) Finally, computer networks could achieve connectivity with a  useable amount of bandwidth without being networked via a wall  socket.  Suddenly connecting multiple computers in a house to share an  Internet connection or play LAN games no longer required  expensive or ugly cabling.  Business users could get up out of their chairs and sit in the  sunshine while they worked.
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802.11 Wireless Networks 802.11 wireless networks operate in one of two modes- ad-hoc or infrastructure mode. In ad hoc mode, each client communicates directly with the other clients within the network, In infrastructure mode, each client sends all of it’s communications to a central station, or access point (AP). The access point acts as an ethernet bridge and forwards the communications onto the appropriate network– either the wired network, or the wireless network.
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A few technical details 802.11b specifies that radios talk on the  unlicensed 2.4GHz band on one of 15 specific  channels  Bandwidth on an 802.11b network is limited to  11Mb per  access point (AP) . This 11Mb is  divided among all users on that access point.  If ten people access the same AP,  communication to the wired world will be limited  to approximately the equivalent of a decent DSL  line.
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SSID Authentication From its inception the 802.11b standard was not  meant to contain a  comprehensive set of  enterprise level security tools
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Service Set Identifier SSID The Service Set Identifier (SSID) is meant to differentiate  networks from one another.  Initially, AP's come set to a default depending on the  manufacturer. Because these default SSID's are so well known, not changing  it makes your network much easier to detect.  Another common mistake regarding the SSID is setting it to  something meaningful such as the AP's location or department,  or setting them to something easily guessable.  The SSID should be created with the same rules as any strong  password (long, non-meaningful strings of characters  including letters, numbers and symbols).
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War -driving, war-walking, war-flying, war-chalking This similar action has been applied to wireless. War-walking, war-driving, war-flying refer to the modes of transportation for going around and identifying various Access Points. Most reports of war-walking, war-driving, and
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Wireless2008 - Wireless Prolegomenon Wi-Fi In 1999 the IEEE...

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