Class Notes - SOUND DESIGN 1 Sound i Film is more visual...

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October 10, 2007 SOUND DESIGN 1) Sound i) Film is more visual than verbal ii) Not accepted easily into film (1) Allefex machine, barkers, sound fx crew – all old modes for presenting sounds to match film in old theaters iii) Neglected in film 2) Components of the soundtrack a) Verbal: i) dialogue ii) off-screen voice: narrators – “I” voice (aware of who the narrator is – usually a char- acter in film); authoritative voice (never aware of who the narrator is) iii) singing b) Music i) Scoring/underscoring – not heard by the character – specifically for the audience (1) Original (2) Composite (3) Combo of both ii) Source music – music in the film heard by the characters iii) Type, length and placing of music c) Sound effects/natural sounds i) All sounds other than verbal and music heard within a film ii) Ambient sound d) Silence e) Concept of sound design i) Origin: 1979 production of Apocalypse Now (1) Director hired walter mersh to create sound design for entire movie (separate script outlining sound) 3) Uses of Sound a) Synchronous sound i) Causal relationship between image and sound (image matches sound) b) Asynchronous sound i) Non causal sound ii) Purposes: avoid repetition, energize off-screen space, c) Sound Montage i) Create meaning with combinations of sound (1) Sound contrast ii) Between sounds iii) Between image and sound (1) Soundtrack approx what the image would be (a) Ex. Spielberg and Williams approx what an approaching shark would be (Jaws theme) (2) Diametrical – opposite of the image d) Sound mix
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i) About 9 sounds over any one image in a movie ii) Dominance of certain sounds create meaning (1) Ex. Dialogue louder than music, or background actions louder than music, etc. e) Size of sounds i) Difference in cu (loud), m(medium), ls(soft), etc. f) Angle of sounds i) Pitch (low angle – low pitch, high angle – high pitch) g) Color of sounds h) Movement of sounds i) Transition between sounds i) Direct cut ii) Fade in/fade out iii) Dissolve iv) Superimpose j) Editing principles k) The choreographed image i) Setting the visuals to the tempo of the music l) Melodeclamation – speak in rythym i) Ex. tony curtis as shell oil jr. ii) Iambic pentameter but dramatically rhythmic 4) Aesthetic effects a) Revealer of reality b) Intensifier of image c) Interpreter of image d) Director of spectator attention within frame e) Subject, source, mover of action f) Setting and characterization: objective/subjective sound g) Mood and atmosphere h) Metaphor/symbol i) Motif i) Reoccurring image of sound j) Overture and lyrical interlude i) Overture goes over credits – medley of music and sound from performance k) Spatial correlative l) Carrier of pace i) Many sounds – faster ii) Less sounds – slower iii) Offscreen energy enhanced by sound October 17, 2007 Forms of Representation: Realism and Formalism Realism
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1) Mode of representation a) Manner in which a work of art is conceived or execute – rendered – meaning translates into the work 2) Film – objective in is rep. of reality/ or subjective a) Realism as Method – way to construct reality b)
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