\u67ef\u6797\u65af\u4e94\u661f\u8bcd - 1 coming noun adjective Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Thesaurus 1 Activator 1 2 3 Phrases from this

u67efu6797u65afu4e94u661fu8bcd - 1 coming noun...

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Unformatted text preview: # 1 单词 coming 解释 noun adjective Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Thesaurus 1 Activator 1 2 3 Phrases from this entry Phrases from other entries Corpus examples com‧ing1 /ˈkʌmɪŋ/ noun 1 the coming of something/somebody the time when something new begins, especially something that will cause a lot of changes: With the coming of railways, new markets opened up. 2 comings and goings informal the movements of people as they arrive at and leave places comings and goings of Beds are arranged so that patients can watch the comings and goings of visitors and staff. THESAURUS next happening or coming immediately after another one: When does the next train to London leave? | I’ll see you next Saturday. following happening or coming immediately after something – used about periods of time, or parts of a piece of writing: We met the following day. | The following weeks passed quickly. | the following pages of the book subsequent formal happening or coming at some time after something else: the subsequent success of the film | This will be explained in more detail in subsequent chapters. | This figure is expected to rise steeply in subsequent years. succeeding coming after someone or something else – used about a series of groups of people, periods of time, or parts of a book: succeeding generations | Succeeding governments have made the same mistake. | During the succeeding weeks he wrote several more letters. coming happening soon: The information will be mailed to members during the coming weeks. | The villagers are storing up wood for the coming winter. noun adjective Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Phrases from other entries Other dictionary examples Corpus examples coming2 adjective [only before noun] formal happening soon: the coming winter → UP-AND-COMING 2 accord noun verb Collocations from this entry Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Phrases from this entry Phrases from other entries Corpus examples ac‧cord1 /әˈkɔːd $ -ɔːrd/ noun Date: 1200-1300 Language: Old French Origin: acort, from acorder; → ACCORD2 1 of sb’s/sth’s own accord without being asked or forced to do something: He decided to go of his own accord. The door seemed to move of its own accord. 2 [uncountable] formal a situation in which two people, ideas, or statements agree with each other be in accord with something These results are in accord with earlier research. in perfect/complete accord It is important to the success of any firm that its partners should be in complete accord. 3 [countable] a formal agreement between countries or groups: the Helsinki accord on human rights 4 with one accord formal if two or more people do something with one accord, they do it together or at the same time: There was a silence as the women turned with one accord to stare at Doreen. noun verb Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Phrases from this entry Other dictionary examples Corpus examples accord2 verb formal Date: 1100-1200 Language: Old French Origin: acorder, from Vulgar Latin accordare, from Latin ad‘to’ + cor ‘heart’ Verb form 1 [transitive] to give someone or something special attention or a particular type of treatment: You will not be accorded any special treatment. accord something to something/somebody Every school accords high priority to the quality of teaching. 2 accord with something to match or agree with something: The punishments accorded with the current code of discipline. 3 got Collocations from other entries Phrases from other entries got /ɡɒt $ ɡɑːt/ the past tense and a past participle of GRAMMAR GET You cannot use got on its own as a present tense meaning 'have' or 'has' in standard English. Say that someone has something or has got something: We've got (NOT We got) some ideas. 4 eight Collocations from other entries Word sets 1 2 eight /eɪt/ number, noun Language: Old English Origin: eahta 1 the number 8: It’s only eight days till Christmas. They woke at eight (=eight o'clock). My parents died when I was eight (=eight years old). 2 [countable] a team of eight people who row a racing boat, or the boat that they row 5 based Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Activator 1 Phrases from this entry Corpus examples based /beɪst/ adjective Word family 1 [not before noun] if you are based somewhere, that is the place where you work or where your main business is: It is a professional service based at our offices in Oxford. London-based/New York-based etc a London-based firm of accountants 2 oil-based/carbon-based/computer-based etc used to describe the basic feature or part of something: computer-based teaching community-based services carbon-based fuels 3 broadly-based based on many kinds of things or people: a broadly-based government of national reconciliation 6 able Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Activator 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Phrases from this entry Phrases from other entries Other dictionary examples Corpus examples a‧ble S1 W1 /ˈeɪbәl/ adjective Word family Date: 1300-1400 Language: Old French Origin: Latin habilis ‘skillful’, from habere ‘to have’ 1 be able to do something a) to have the skill, strength, knowledge etc needed to do something: I’ve always wanted to be able to speak Japanese. b) to be in a situation in which it is possible for you to do something: I’d like to do more gardening, but I never seem able to find the time. I haven’t been able to read that report yet. 2 clever or good at doing something: one of my more able students Other dictionary examples -able /әbәl/ (also -ible) suffix [in adjectives] Language: Old French Origin: Latin -abilis, from -bilis ‘capable or worthy of’ 1 that you can do something to: washable (=it can be washed) unbreakable (=it cannot be broken) loveable (=easy to love) 2 having a particular quality or condition: knowledgeable (=knowing a lot) comfortable —-ably /әbli/, -ibly suffix [in adverbs]: unbelievably 7 about preposition adverb adjective Collocations from this entry Collocations from other entries Thesaurus 1 Activator 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Phrases from this entry Phrases from other entries Other dictionary examples a‧bout1 S1 W1 /әˈbaʊt/ preposition 1 concerning or relating to a particular subject: a book about politics She said something about leaving town. He lied about his age. About that car of yours. How much are you selling it for? What’s he on about (=talking about)? It’s about Tommy, doctor. He’s been sick again. Naturally, my mother wanted to know all about it (=all the details relating to it). 2 used to show why someone is angry, happy, upset etc: I’m really worried about Jack. She’s upset about missing the party. 3 in many different directions within a particular place, or in different parts of a place SYN around, round: We spent the whole afternoon walking about town. Books were scattered about the room. 4 in the nature or character of a person or thing: There’s something really strange about Liza. What I like about the job is that it’s never boring. 5 what/how about somebody/something spoken a) used to ask a question that directs attention to another person or thing: What about Jack? We can’t just leave him here. I’m feeling hungry. How about you? b) used to make a suggestion: How about a salad for lunch? 6 do something about something to do something to solve a problem or stop a bad situation: If we don’t do something about it, the problem is going to get worse. What can be done about the rising levels of pollution? 7 if an organization, a job, an activity etc is about something, that is its basic purpose: Leadership is all about getting your team to co-operate. 8 it’s all about somebody/something used to say who or what is important in a situation: It’s all about money, and who’s got the most. 9 while you’re about it spoken used to tell someone to do something while they are doing something else because it would be easier to do both things at the same time: Go and see what’s the matter, and while you’re about it you can fetch me my sweater. 10 what was all that about? spoken used to ask the reason for something that has just happened, especially someone’s angry behaviour 11 literary surrounding a person or thing: Jo sensed fear and jealousy all about her. → be quick about it AT QUICK1(5), → go about your business AT BUSINESS(12) THESAURUS about used when saying what the subject of something is: She’s always talking about you. | In her novels she writes about life in South Africa. | There’s something I wanted to ask you about. on about a particular subject: a book on English grammar | a report on poverty in rural areas concerning/regarding formal about: Prince Saiid answered questions concerning Kuwait’s future. | The report raises a number of questions regarding food safety. with regard to formal about – used especially when you want to start talking or writing about something: Dear Sir, I’m writing with regard to your advertisement in The Times. re used in business letters and in emails to introduce the subject that you are going to write about: Re: Friday’s meeting preposition adverb adjective Collocations from this entry Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Activator 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Phrases from this entry Phrases from other entries Other dictionary examples Corpus examples about2 S1 W1 adverb Language: Old English Origin: abutan, from a- ‘on’ + butan ‘outside’ 1 (also round about spoken) a little more or less than a particular number, amount, or size SYN roughly, approximately: I live about 10 miles away. a tiny computer about as big as a postcard We left the restaurant at round about 10.30. REGISTER In written English, people usually prefer to use approximately, as it sounds more technical: The cost to taxpayers is approximately $200 billion. 2 British English in many different directions within a place or in different parts of a place SYN around: People were rushing about, trying to find the driver. Cushions were scattered about on the chairs. 3 near to you or in the same place as you: Is Derek about? There’s a phone call for him. Quick! Let’s go while there’s no-one about. 4 British English spoken existing or available now: I hope she hasn’t caught flu. There’s a lot of it about. She might get temporary work, but there’s not much about. 5 informal almost or probably: I was about ready to leave when somebody rang the doorbell. ‘Have you finished?’ ‘Just about.’ It’s just about the worst mistake anyone could make. 6 that’s about it/all spoken a) used to tell someone that you have told them everything you know: He was a quiet chap, married with kids. That’s about it, really. b) used to say that there is nothing else available: There’s some cheese in the fridge and that’s about it. 7 so as to face in the opposite direction SYN around: He quickly turned about and walked away. preposition adverb adjective Collocations from other entries Thesaurus 1 Phrases from this entry Phrases from other entries about3 adjective 1 be about to do something if someone is about to do something, or if something is about to happen, they will do it or it will happen very soon: We were just about to leave when Jerry arrived. Work was about to start on a new factory building. 2 not be about to do something informal used to emphasize that you have no intention of doing something: I’ve never smoked in my life and I’m not about to start now. → out and about AT OUT1(3), → be up and about AT UP1(11) THESAURUS approximately more or less than a number or amount – used especially in technical or scientific contexts: The company had total revenues of approximately $2 million. | The disease affects approximately 10% of the adult population. about more or less than a number or amount. ‘About’ is the usual word to use in everyday English: It costs about $30 to get a visa. | There were about 50 people at the meeting. roughly /ˈrʌfli/ about – used when you are trying to give someone a general idea of the size, amount, or number of something: The two countries are roughly the same size. | Roughly how many miles do you travel a year? around about a number or time – used when you are guessing: I’ll be there around 5 o'clock. | The BBC broadcasts around 2,000 radio dramas every year. somewhere/something in the region of formal about – used with very large numbers or amounts: Last year he earned something in the region of $60 million. | It costs somewhere in the region of £100,000 to train a new doctor. or so informal about – used after a period of time, a number, or an amount: The journey takes an hour or so. circa /ˈsɜːkə $ ˈsɜːr-/ formal about – used with dates a long time ago in the past: The house was built circa 1530. or more used after a number or amount, when the total may be a lot more: A thirty-second commercial can cost £60,000 or more. upwards of more than a number or amount: The aircraft can carry upwards of 400 passengers. 8 accept Collocations from this entry Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Thesaurus 1 Activator 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Phrases from this entry Other dictionary examples Corpus examples ac‧cept S1 W1 /әkˈsept/ verb 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. GIFT/OFFER/INVITATION SITUATION/PROBLEM ETC THINK SB/STH IS GOOD ENOUGH BECOME PART OF A GROUP AGREE TO TAKE/DEAL WITH STH SUGGESTION/ADVICE BELIEVE AN EXPLANATION/STATEMENT accept responsibility/blame for sth Word family Date: 1300-1400 Language: French Origin: accepter, from Latin acceptare, from accipere ‘to receive’, from ad- ‘to’ + capere ‘to take’ Verb form 1 GIFT/OFFER/INVITATION [intransitive and transitive] to take something that someone offers you, or to agree to do something that someone asks you to do OPP refuse: Rick accepted her offer of coffee. He accepted the invitation to stay with us. His school reports said that he is always ready to accept a challenge (=agree to do something difficult). Please accept this small gift. They offered me a job and I accepted. accept something from somebody He accepted a glass of water from Helen. He readily accepted her invitation (=accepted it quickly). REGISTER In everyday English, when talking about accepting a job, accepting responsibility or blame, or accepting a method of payment, people usually use take: They offered me the job and I accepted. ➔ They offered me the job and I took it. When talking about accepting an offer, people often say take someone up on their offer: He decided to take her up on her offer. 2 SITUATION/PROBLEM ETC [transitive] to decide that there is nothing you can do to change a difficult and unpleasant situation or fact and continue with your normal life: He’s not going to change, and you just have to accept it. accept that We have to accept that this is not an ideal world. You need to accept the fact that most of your problems are caused by jealousy. 3 THINK SOMEBODY/SOMETHING IS GOOD ENOUGH [transitive] to decide that someone has the necessary skill or intelligence for a particular job, course etc or that a piece of work is good enough OPP reject: Students accepted by Stanford Law School had very high scores on the LSAT. accept somebody/something as something They have accepted him as the representative of the company. accept somebody/something for something Random House accepted the book for publication. 4 BECOME PART OF A GROUP [transitive] to allow someone to become part of a group, society, or organization, and to treat them in the same way as the other members OPP reject accept somebody as something The children gradually began to accept her as one of the family. accept somebody into something It often takes years for immigrants to be accepted into the host community. 5 AGREE TO TAKE/DEAL WITH SOMETHING [transitive] to agree to take or deal with something that someone gives you, or to say that it is suitable or good enough: The government has accepted the resignation of a senior army commander. Please accept my sincere apologies. Sorry, we don’t accept traveller’s cheques. 6 SUGGESTION/ADVICE [transitive] to decide to do what someone suggests or advises you should do: Be prepared to accept the advice of members of staff. 7 BELIEVE AN EXPLANATION/STATEMENT [transitive] to agree that what someone says is right or true OPP reject: She has accepted your explanation as to why you didn’t attend the meeting. 8 accept responsibility/blame for something to admit that you were responsible for something bad that happened: The University will not accept responsibility for items lost or stolen. COLLOCATIONS NOUNS accept an offer In the end I had to accept his offer of £4,500. accept an invitation Are you going to accept their invitation to the wedding? accept help Don’t be afraid to accept help if you need it. accept aid Egypt gratefully accepted American economic aid. accept assistance They were ready to accept French military assistance. accept a challenge To protect the environment we must accept some difficult challenges. accept an award Miller accepted the award for best comedy show. accept an opportunity I wish that I’d accepted the opportunity to retire when it was offered. accept a gift/present Accepting presents from him made her feel uncomfortable. accept a job She was desperate for money so she accepted the job. accept a lift British English, accept a ride American English I had been taught not to accept lifts from strangers. accept a bribe The president’s family and friends accepted massive bribes in exchange for official favours. ADVERBS gladly/willingly/readily accept She invited him for a drink and he gladly accepted. gratefully accept He gratefully accepted Athena’s help. graciously accept She accepted her gift graciously. 9 account noun verb Collocations from this entry Collocations from other entries Collocations from the corpus Thesaurus 1 Activator 1 2 3 4 5 6 Phrases from this entry Phrases from other entries Other dictionary examples Corpus examples ac‧count1 S1 W1 /әˈkaʊnt/ noun [countable] 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. DESCRIPTION AT A BANK take account of sth on account of sth accounts on account WITH A SHOP/COMPANY BILL 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. ARRANGEMENT TO SELL GOODS by/from all accounts on sb’s account on your own account on no account/not on any account by sb’s own account on that account/on this account give a good/poor account of yourself bring/call sb to account put/turn sth to good account of no/little account 1 DESCRIPTION a written or spoken description that says what happens in an event or process account of He was too shocked to give an account of what had happened. blow-by-blow account (=a description of all the details of an event in the order that they happened) a blow-by-blow account of how England lost to Portugal Chomsky’s account of how children learn their first language eye-witness/first-hand account (=a description of events by someone who saw them) Eye-witness accounts told of the unprovoked shooting of civilians. This gives a first-hand account of the war. 2 AT A BANK (written abbreviation a/c or acct.) an arrangement in which a bank keeps your money safe so that you can pay more in or take money out: My salary is paid into my bank account. I’ve opened an account with Barclay’s Bank. My husband and I have a joint account (=one that is shared between two people). → BANK ACCOUNT, CHECKING ACCOUNT, CURRENT ACCOUNT, DEPOSIT ACCOUNT, PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT, SAVINGS ACCOUNT 3 take account of something (also take something into account) to consider or include particular facts or details when making a decision or judgment about something: These figures do not take account of changes in the rate of inflation. 4 on account of something because of something else, especially a problem or difficulty: She was told to wear flat shoes, on account of her back problem. 5 accounts a) [plural] an exact record of the money that a company has received and the money it has spent: The accounts for last year showed a profit of $2 million. b) [uncountable] a d...
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