Anthro Lecture 2-7 - Anthro Lecture 2/7 I Monkeys can...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Anthro Lecture 2/7 I. Monkeys can predict what others will do a. Macaques and baboons often grunt when they approach others b. Grunts are reliable predictor of peaceful interaction c. Grunting facilitates friendly contact d. Grunting facilitates infant handling II. Ability to understand others’ thoughts, beliefs is called “theory of mind” a. In humans, TOM develops in early childhood b. Common experiment to test for TOM c. “False belief test” d. M and M pencil test – up to the age of three, the adult will think that a pencil is in the tube e. After the age of 3, children say M and M’s III. Theory of Mind a. TOM is necessary for deception and imitation i. Deficit in TOM is thought to be central to the disorder autism b. TOM can be broken down into three components, of increasing sophistication i. Understanding what others can see or hear (perception) ii. Understanding others’ intentions iii. Understanding others’ knowledge/beliefs c. Monkeys consistently fail TOM tests d. How much TOM apes have is controversial e. What do apes know about what others can see? i. Call and Tomasello 1994 ii. Subjects: 2 captive orangutans that know how to point as a signal iii. Task: point to the desired drink (the larger one)
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
iv. Conditions: 1. Experimenter has left the room after setting up the drinks 2. Experiment has walked to the opposite side of the room and turned his back on the subject 3. Experimenter faces the drinks and the subject with eyes closed 4. Experimenter faces the drinks and the subject with eyes open v. Results 1. Subjects behavior and coded “blind” 2. Very little pointing in conditions 1 and 2 3. Lots of pointing in condition 4 4. Only a home-raised orangutan refrained from pointing in condition 3 vi. Povinelli and co-workers have argued that chimpanzees don’t know about what others can see vii.Chimpanzees given the choice of which to human to beg from (using species-typical palm-out begging gesture) when the two humans differ in some way viii. Chimps consistently prefer to beg in someone facing towards them ix. Do not prefer 1. Human with eyes open to human with eyes closed 2. Human with blindfold over mouth to humans over eyes 3. Human with bucket on their shoulder with a bucket on their head 4. Human with back turned while looking over her shoulder at the chimp to human with back turned while looking away from chimp x. Yet, the same chimps do follow the gaze of humans 1. Look in the direction that an experimenter looks, even if the
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern