HOPE LESSON 6 DBA - OBESITY IS A DISEASE Child and...

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OBESITY IS A DISEASE Child and Adolescent BMI Ranges — Text Version Female BMI Graph Graph of BMI percentile ranges for females ages 2 to 20. The graph shows percentile ranges for underweight, healthy, overweight, and obese BMI values, with an overall increase for each of these ranges as age increases. Underweight is less than fifth percentile, healthy weight ranges from fifth to eighty-fifth percentile, overweight is eighty- fifth to less than ninety-fifth, and obese is ninety-fifth percentile or higher. Male BMI Graph Graph of BMI percentile ranges for males ages 2 to 20. The graph shows percentile ranges for underweight, healthy, overweight, and obese BMI values, with an overall increase for each of these ranges as age increases. Underweight is less than fifth percentile, healthy weight ranges from fifth to eighty-fifth percentile, overweight is eighty- fifth to less than ninety-fifth, and obese is ninety-fifth percentile or higher. Times Have Changed The main cause of excess body fat is an imbalance between calories consumed and calories used. In addition, there has been a global increase in the consumption of calorie-dense foods that are high in fat but low in nutrients and a decrease in physical activity due to: increases in desk jobs and other sedentary forms of work greater dependency on cars and other transportation shifts from rural to more urban and suburban communities In the past century, our society has changed from being primarily agricultural and labor based to an economy that is more technology and knowledge based. Along with its many benefits, this shift has helped contribute to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle. Even 30 years ago, most people led more active lifestyles that helped them maintain a healthy weight. Talk to your parents and grandparents and they can easily point out how their childhood and teen years were different. For example, no cell phones or internet (gasp!) meant people spent more time hanging outside with friends.
Most students walked or rode bikes to school Kids played games at recess and in afterschool programs Young people spent hours playing outside each day Most meals were homecooked Snacks were rare, maybe one a day Smaller portion sizes, especially with sweets and junk food Majority take a bus or car to school Recess time, PE classes, and afterschool programs are being cut back Average of 7.5 hours on TV, internet, and phone each day Fast food and processed foods are popular for busy families Snacking is commonplace, often three to six a day On average, we eat 31% more calories and 14% more sugar than in the 1970s very important, prevents div collapsing
1970 4% of 6- to 11-year-olds 6% of 12- to 19-year-olds 15% of adults 2008 20% of 6- to 11-year-olds 18% of 12- to 19-year-olds 34% of adults The Health Risks Obesity can lead to the following health problems: Heart disease High blood pressure Type 2 diabetes Asthma Sleep apnea Fatty liver disease Gallstones

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