too many bugs

too many bugs - 1. Hymenoptera Symphyta Identifying...

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1. Hymenoptera Symphyta Identifying characteristics for the family Cimbicidae include: Suborder Symphyta: base of abdomen broadly joined to thorax. Large, robust sawflies, 18-25 mm in length. Antennae slightly clubbed. Trochanters 2-segmented; front tibia with 2 apical spurs. Identifying characteristics for the family Siricidae include: Suborder Symphyta: base of abdomen broadly joined to thorax. Large, stoutbodied hymenopterans. Front tibia with 1 apical spur. Dorsal spine or plate on last segment of abdomen of both sexes. Apocrita * Ichneumonoidea Identifying characteristics for the family Braconidae include: Antennae apparently with 16 or more segments. Hind trochanters 2-segmented. One or no recurrent veins. Usually black or brown; some common species with reddish markings. Females often with long ovipositors
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Identifying characteristics for the family Ichneumonidae include: Antennae apparently with 16 or more segments. Hind trochanters 2-segmented. Two recurrent veins. Usually larger than braconids; quite variable in color. Females often with long ovipositors. Identifying characteristics for the family Chrysididae include: Body metallic blue or green, usually with coarse sculpturing. Abdomen concave beneath, allowing chrysidids to curl up into a ball when disturbed.
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Identifying characteristics for the family Scoliidae include: Large, robust wasps with hairy bodies. Distal section of wings with numerous longitudinal wrinkles. The mesosternum and the metasternum are separated by a straight transverse suture. Identifying characteristics for the family Mutillidae include: Females hairy and wingless, resembling ants, usually reddish or orangish in color. Males winged and with fewer hairs.
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Identifying characteristics for the family Formicidae include: Antennae geniculate. Petiole with one or two distinct nodes. Generally lacking wings.
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Identifying characteristics for the family Vespidae include: Legs of normal length, not as long as those of the Pompilidae. Wings folded longitudinally at rest; first discoidal cell of FW greater than half the wing length (longer than pompilids). Inner margin of eye usually notched. Pronotum extending back to the tegulae, the pronotum thus appearing triangular when viewed from the side and horseshoe-shaped when viewed from above. Identifying characteristics for the family Halictidae include: As in other families of the superfamily Apoidea, members of the family Halictidae have: o a collarlike pronotum without projections that reach the tegulae, o body hairs that are branched or plumose, and o first segment of the metatarsus often enlarged and flattened.
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too many bugs - 1. Hymenoptera Symphyta Identifying...

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