Chaucers View on Medieval Values or Expectations

Chaucers View on Medieval Values or Expectations - April...

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April Stamm 7-Mar-08 Journal Entry The Canterbury Tales are meant to be read with a grain of salt, because they tend to be over the top exaggerations of the things that Chaucer wants to make apparent. He goes so far with his satire that he does not even claim it onto himself; he creates a character through which the audience will (hopefully) separate the tales from Chaucer himself. He addresses the most prevalent medieval values through each tale with a lot of satire. The Miller’s tale, as a whole, is a satire on courtly love, sex/marriage/adultery, and deceit/beguiling. The Miller (drunk at the time) tells the story in response to the Knight’s tale of courtly love. This tale satires all of the Knight’s work with his story by making the young relationship between Alison and Nicholas as raunchy as possible. It also touches on adultery and makes a cuckold out of Alison’s husband the carpenter. This makes For example, Alison is a prime example of extreme satire. She is the sexy young
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Chaucers View on Medieval Values or Expectations - April...

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