Sin and Gawin - April Stamm 13-Feb-08 Journal Entry I...

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April Stamm 13-Feb-08 Journal Entry I became aware that I should read for contradictions or exaggerations right off the bat. When the narrator is giving the history of the story he seems to claim that the story has both an oral tradition and a written tradition (before him), “As I heard it in hall, I shall hasten to tell anew. As it was fashioned featly/In tale of derring-do,/And linked in measures meetly/By letters tried and true.” This seemed just a little off to me, because in my eyes you can’t set it up as having been presented to you in both formats because one must have influenced you to tell it. Even as you begin the story you can see the narrator’s innocent point of view. I found his descriptions of the things in the opening scene to be very insubstantial and overly complementary, a trait that I associate with innocence to ones surrounding. I also found it strange when the Green Knight was present and everyone seemed terrified/shocked then when he left (almost immediately when he left) everyone seemed to forget this strange and frightening event
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Sin and Gawin - April Stamm 13-Feb-08 Journal Entry I...

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