Fate in Beowulf - April Stamm 28-Jan-08 Journal Entry The...

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April Stamm 28-Jan-08 Journal Entry The two fights obviously have several very different choices involved; I mean Beowulf was in a very different position by means of society before the two fights. He was much older and in a position with more responsibility when he encountered the Dragon than when he fought Grendel. This means that he would feel pressure from his people to enter the battle against the Dragon (for protection of his people) while he chose the battle with Grendel under less pressure. The locations of the fights were even drastically different. Grendal came to Herot hall and was clearly antagonizing the people the night of the fight. In contrast, Beowulf went out to hunt down the Dragon because the enraged Dragon was posing a great threat to his people’s safety. Beowulf is a predominantly Pagan tale, so the idea of fate plays a large role in the character’s thinking. Each time that Beowulf entered battle he made reference to this concept of fate, which was very much like the Greek fate or Augustine choice. He did not attribute any of
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This note was uploaded on 05/14/2008 for the course GN_HON 2112 taught by Professor Dawson during the Spring '08 term at Missouri (Mizzou).

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Fate in Beowulf - April Stamm 28-Jan-08 Journal Entry The...

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