The Cid - April Stamm 28-Jan-08 Journal Entry The Cid's...

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April Stamm 28-Jan-08 Journal Entry The Cid’s title, Campeador, meaning the Champion comes from a Latin term and was given to him by his Christian followers. The Arabic title, El Cid, was a term of respect bestowed more likely by his non-Christian followers. This division of the main character shows some discrepancy in his own religious ideas; it seems clear that he views himself as a Christian, “I can be certain of defeating them [the moors] with God on my side;” however, he is in a divided world. They are still surrounded by non-Christian figures. In the story, the Islams/Muslims (commonly called the Moors) tend to be looked down upon and seem to be an almost unworthy enemy. They are much like the orcs in Lord of the Rings. When going into battle against them, the Cid and his followers tend to speak of how easy the battle will be and how they are unable to lose because they have God on their side. They make a game of the battles, going so far as to count the numbers they have defeated. They don’t
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The Cid - April Stamm 28-Jan-08 Journal Entry The Cid's...

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